Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2252653
 


 



Digital Planning: The Future of Elder Law


Gerry W. Beyer


Texas Tech University School of Law

Naomi Cahn


George Washington University - Law School

February 15, 2013

NAELA Journal, Vol. 9, p. 135, 2013
GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2013-94
GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 2013-94

Abstract:     
More than half of individuals over the age of 65 use the Internet or e-mail — and they are a fast-growing population on the Internet. Like most people, however, they have probably not considered how to dispose of their digital life if they become incapacitated or when they die, even though they are in the most likely age group to have drafted a will. Indeed, even if they do engage in planning, they cannot be confident that their wishes will be carried out: only a few states have laws covering probate and digital assets, there is no generally accepted method for using wills or trusts to dispose of digital assets, and the policies of Internet providers often preclude the exercise of individual autonomy. As Internet usage becomes even more pervasive and as online assets and accounts have the potential to become even more valuable (emotionally and financially), issues involving control of digital property are rapidly becoming even more important.

This article first explains digital assets as a new species of property and discusses the importance of planning for these assets. The article next analyzes the legal context for digital asset disposition, including the few existing state laws, and then turns its attention to the future, including suggestions for planning and commentary on where the law might be headed. Notwithstanding the legal uncertainties surrounding digital asset disposition, individuals should make plans for the management, ownership, or destruction of these assets based on the foundational principles of deference to the individual’s intent. Acknowledging the difficulty of predicting the future, the authors feel quite confident that, as Elder Law moves forward, planning for a client’s digital assets will assume an increasingly important role.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 24

Keywords: will, trusts, digital assets, internet, passwords, estate planning, elder law

JEL Classification: K11

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: April 18, 2013 ; Last revised: June 25, 2013

Suggested Citation

Beyer, Gerry W. and Cahn, Naomi, Digital Planning: The Future of Elder Law (February 15, 2013). NAELA Journal, Vol. 9, p. 135, 2013; GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2013-94; GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 2013-94. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2252653

Contact Information

Gerry W. Beyer (Contact Author)
Texas Tech University School of Law ( email )
1802 Hartford
Lubbock, TX 79409
United States
806-742-3990 (Phone)
978-285-7941 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.ProfessorBeyer.com
Naomi R. Cahn
George Washington University - Law School ( email )
2000 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
United States
202-994-6025 (Phone)
202-994-5614 (Fax)
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