Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2258830
 
 

References (60)



 


 



Rethinking the Economic Model of Deterrence: How Insights from Empirical Social Science Could Affect Policies Towards Crime and Punishment


Erik James Girvan


University of Oregon School of Law

2009

Review of Law & Economics, 5, 461 (2009)

Abstract:     
Game-theoretic models incorporating neo-classical economic assumptions can be a powerful tool for identifying and analyzing issues relevant to legal policy. In this paper I argue that, where those assumptions are deficient, the efficacy of and insights from such models can be improved by incorporating insights from experimental social sciences. Following this paradigm, I propose an expansion of the neo-classical deterrence model of criminal behavior to incorporate, as reputation effects, social scientific theory regarding the effects of in-group norms on behavior. Analysis of the expanded model shows that there are material differences between the classic and expanded models in predictions, the latter of which are more consistent with macro-level observations. I then discuss some substantive implications of the predictions of the expanded model for criminal legal policy.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 31

Keywords: discrimination, criminal law, law and economics, law and society, law and psychology

JEL Classification: K14

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: May 2, 2013 ; Last revised: June 21, 2013

Suggested Citation

Girvan, Erik James, Rethinking the Economic Model of Deterrence: How Insights from Empirical Social Science Could Affect Policies Towards Crime and Punishment (2009). Review of Law & Economics, 5, 461 (2009). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2258830

Contact Information

Erik James Girvan (Contact Author)
University of Oregon School of Law ( email )
1515 Agate Street
Eugene, OR 97403
United States
541 346-8934 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://law.uoregon.edu/faculty/girvan/
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 177
Downloads: 29
References:  60
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.453 seconds