Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=226148
 
 

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Monetary Policy Shocks: What Have We Learned and to What End?


Lawrence J. Christiano


Northwestern University; Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Martin Eichenbaum


Northwestern University; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Charles L. Evans


Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago - Research Department

February 1998

NBER Working Paper No. w6400

Abstract:     
This paper reviews recent research that grapples with the question: What happens after an exogenous shock to monetary policy? We argue that this question is interesting because it lies at the center of a particular approach to assessing the empirical plausibility of structural economic models that can be used to think about systematic changes in monetary policy institutions and rules. The literature has not yet converged on a particular set of assumptions for identifying the effects of an exogenous shock to monetary policy. Nevertheless, there is considerable agreement about the qualitative effects of a monetary policy shock in the sense that inference is robust across a large subset of the identification schemes that have been considered in the literature. We document the nature of this agreement as it pertains to key economic aggregates.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 95

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Date posted: July 21, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Christiano, Lawrence J. and Eichenbaum, Martin and Evans, Charles L., Monetary Policy Shocks: What Have We Learned and to What End? (February 1998). NBER Working Paper No. w6400. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=226148

Contact Information

Lawrence J. Christiano (Contact Author)
Northwestern University ( email )
2003 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-8231 (Phone)
847-491-7001 (Fax)
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
East 6th & Superior
Cleveland, OH 44101-1387
United States
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
230 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60604
United States
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
90 Hennepin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55480
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Martin Eichenbaum
Northwestern University ( email )
2003 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-8232 (Phone)
847-491-7001 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Charles L. Evans
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago - Research Department ( email )
230 South LaSalle Street
P.O. Box 834
Chicago, IL 60604-1413
United States
312-322-5812 (Phone)
312-322-2357 (Fax)
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