Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=226736
 
 

References (24)



 
 

Citations (21)



 


 



Education and Unemployment


Jacob Mincer


Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

September 1991

NBER Working Paper No. w3838

Abstract:     
A major benefit of education is the lower risk of unemployment at higher educational levels. In PSID (Panel Study of Income Dynamics) data on the male labor force1 the reduction of the incidence of unemployment is found to be far more important than the reduced duration of unemployment in creating the educational differentials in unemployment rates. In turn, the lesser unemployment incidence of the more educated workers is, in about equal measure, due to their greater attachment to the firms employing them, and to the lesser risk of becoming unemployed when separated from the firm. The lesser frequency of job turnover of more educated workers, which creates fewer episodes of unemployment, is in large part attributable to more on-the-job training. In explaining the lesser conditional unemployment of educated workers and the somewhat shorter duration of their unemployment, indirect evidence is provided that (1) costs of on-the-job search for new employment relative to costs of searching while unemployed are lower for more educated workers; (2) that these workers are also more efficient in acquiring and processing job search information; and (3) that firms and workers search more intensively to fill more skilled vacancies.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 35

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: April 27, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Mincer, Jacob, Education and Unemployment (September 1991). NBER Working Paper No. w3838. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=226736

Contact Information

Jacob Mincer (Contact Author)
Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics ( email )
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States
212-854-3676 (Phone)
212-854-8059 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 3,689
Downloads: 178
Download Rank: 97,051
References:  24
Citations:  21

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo4 in 0.312 seconds