Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=226811
 
 

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Liquidity Effects, Monetary Policy, and the Business Cycle


Martin Eichenbaum


Northwestern University; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lawrence J. Christiano


Northwestern University; Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

August 1992

NBER Working Paper No. w4129

Abstract:     
This paper presents new empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that positive money supply shocks drive short-term interest rates down. We then present a quantitative, general equilibrium model which is consistent with the hypothesis. The two key features of our model are that (i) money shocks have a heterogeneous impact on agents and (ii) ex post inflexibilities in production give rise to a very low short-run interest elasticity of money demand. Together, these imply that, in our model, a positive money supply shock generates a large drop in the interest rate comparable in magnitude to what we find in the data. In sharp contrast to sticky nominal wage models, our model implies that positive money supply shocks lead to increases in the real wage. We report evidence that this is consistent with the U.S. data. Finally, we show that our model can rationalize a version of the Real Bills Doctrine in which the monetary authority accommodates technology shocks, thereby smoothing interest rates.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 51

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Date posted: June 9, 2004  

Suggested Citation

Eichenbaum, Martin and Christiano, Lawrence J., Liquidity Effects, Monetary Policy, and the Business Cycle (August 1992). NBER Working Paper No. w4129. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=226811

Contact Information

Martin Eichenbaum (Contact Author)
Northwestern University ( email )
2003 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-8232 (Phone)
847-491-7001 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Lawrence J. Christiano
Northwestern University ( email )
2003 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-8231 (Phone)
847-491-7001 (Fax)
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
East 6th & Superior
Cleveland, OH 44101-1387
United States
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
230 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60604
United States
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
90 Hennepin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55480
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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