Abstract

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Economic Growth, Population Theory, and Physiology: The Bearing of Long-Term Processes on the Making of Economic Policy


Robert W. Fogel


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

February 1994

NBER Working Paper No. w4638

Abstract:     
This paper sketches a theory of the secular decline in morbidity and mortality that takes account of changes in human physiology since 1700. The synergism between technological and physiological improvements has produced a form of human evolution, much more rapid than natural selection, which is still ongoing in both OECD and developing countries. Thermodynamic and physiological aspects of economic growth are defined and their impact on growth rates is assessed. Implications of this theory for population forecasting, measurement of national income, demand for leisure, pension policies, and for the demand for health care are considered.

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Date posted: July 26, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Fogel , Robert W., Economic Growth, Population Theory, and Physiology: The Bearing of Long-Term Processes on the Making of Economic Policy (February 1994). NBER Working Paper No. w4638. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=226957

Contact Information

Robert W. Fogel (Contact Author)
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
1101 East 58th Street
Center for Population Economics
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-7709 (Phone)
773-702-2901 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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