Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2269808
 


 



Too Big to Jail or Too Abstract (or Rich) to Care


Victor Byers Flatt


University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law ; University of Houston Global Energy Management Institute

May 23, 2013

Maryland Law Review, Vol. 72, p. 101, 2013
UNC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2269808

Abstract:     
Why has environmental enforcement waned as environmental harms continue to grow bigger? This article, part of a symposium on enforcement of laws in the environmental and financial sectors, posits that a change in perceived immediacy of environmental harm, coupled with a change in communitarian attitudes, contributes to the lack of enforcement rigor.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 36

Keywords: environmental law, environmental enforcement, communitarian ideals, climate change, environmental rights, economic disparity, individualization, cost-benefit analysis

JEL Classification: A13, B30, D31, D61, D62, D63, D64, G18, H11, H23, H30, H41, I18, J17, K13, K23, K32, O13, P16, Q25

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Date posted: May 26, 2013  

Suggested Citation

Flatt, Victor Byers, Too Big to Jail or Too Abstract (or Rich) to Care (May 23, 2013). Maryland Law Review, Vol. 72, p. 101, 2013; UNC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2269808. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2269808

Contact Information

Victor Byers Flatt (Contact Author)
University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law ( email )
Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road
CB #3380
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.law.unc.edu/faculty/directory/details.aspx?cid=1022

University of Houston Global Energy Management Institute ( email )
Houston, TX 77204-6021
United States
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