Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2278261
 


 



MOOCs and Legal Education: Valuable Innovation or Looming Disaster?


Philip G. Schrag


Georgetown University - Law Center

June 10, 2013

59 Villanova Law Review 83 (2014)
Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 13-055

Abstract:     
Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have spread across the landscape of higher education like an invasive plant species. Although few people had heard of MOOCs before 2012, these internet-based courses, taught by university professors, are now routinely offered simultaneously to tens of thousands or in some cases, hundreds of thousands of people. Most MOOCs are still provided free of charge, but the two companies and one non-profit entity that promote MOOCs and provide the software have recently created partnerships with institutions of higher education in order to realize substantial revenues by offering MOOCs for academic credit to tuition-paying students at colleges and universities. Despite resistance from professors at some institutions, MOOCs for credit are proliferating rapidly. This development has great significance for the future of legal education, because most law schools are experiencing an economic crisis and are searching for ways to cut costs and lower tuition so that they can fill their classes and remain viable. Already, some law schools are offering academic credit for distance learning, within limits permitted by the Section of Legal Education of the American Bar Association — limits that may soon be relaxed. Within ten years, MOOCs could replace traditional law school classes altogether, except at a few elite law schools that produce lawyers to serve large corporations and wealthy individuals. However, most law schools might survive by embracing rather than resisting internet-based learning. They could cut costs by reducing faculty and staff positions, using MOOCs for the delivery of most of the legal information that students need, hiring part-time lawyers to help students with exercises to supplement the MOOCs, and concentrating the remaining full-time faculty on first-semester offerings, writing seminars, and clinics. Sadly, the result will be a watered-down form of legal education compared to the three years of interactive experiences that law schools have offered students for the last century. But it may be the only way in which most law schools can survive.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 52

Keywords: legal education, MOOC, distance learning, legal profession

JEL Classification: K00, K10, K19

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Date posted: June 25, 2013 ; Last revised: April 16, 2014

Suggested Citation

Schrag, Philip G., MOOCs and Legal Education: Valuable Innovation or Looming Disaster? (June 10, 2013). 59 Villanova Law Review 83 (2014); Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 13-055. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2278261 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2278261

Contact Information

Philip G. Schrag (Contact Author)
Georgetown University - Law Center ( email )
600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001
United States
202 662 9099 (Phone)
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