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Saving and Growth: A Reinterpretation


Christopher D. Carroll


Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

David N. Weil


Brown University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

September 1993

NBER Working Paper No. w4470

Abstract:     
We examine the relationship between income growth and saving using both cross-country and household data. At the aggregate level, we find that growth Granger causes saving, but that saving does not Granger cause growth. Using household data, we find that households with predictably higher income growth save more than households with predictably low growth. We argue that standard Permanent Income models of consumption cannot explain these findings, but that a model of consumption with habit formation may. The positive effect of growth on saving implies that previous estimates of the effect of saving on growth may be overstated.

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Date posted: May 18, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Carroll, Christopher D. and Weil, David N., Saving and Growth: A Reinterpretation (September 1993). NBER Working Paper No. w4470. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=227972

Contact Information

Christopher D. Carroll
Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics ( email )
3400 Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218-2685
United States
410-516-7602 (Phone)
303-845-7533 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
David Nathan Weil (Contact Author)
Brown University - Department of Economics ( email )
Box B
Providence, RI 02912
United States
401-863-1754 (Phone)
401-863-1970 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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