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http://ssrn.com/abstract=228298
 
 

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Child Custody in the Age of Children's Rights: The Search for a Just and Workable Standard


Barbara Bennett Woodhouse


Emory University School of Law; University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law


Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 3, Fall 1999

Abstract:     
Reformers heralded the twentieth century as "The Century of the Child." In international law, that description proved prophetic. Children's rights have moved from the margins of discussion to center stage. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child is the most rapidly and universally accepted human rights document of our century. The Convention is striking evidence of a major twentieth-century revolution in how we conceptualize children's law. This essay provides a condensed and admittedly impressionistic account of the development of the best interest standard and of the arguments raised both for and against it. The author concludes that the future of custody law lies in perfecting the best interest standard, not in abandoning it for simpler alternatives that lack a child-centered justification.

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Date posted: August 2, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett, Child Custody in the Age of Children's Rights: The Search for a Just and Workable Standard. Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 3, Fall 1999. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=228298

Contact Information

Barbara Bennett Woodhouse (Contact Author)
Emory University School of Law ( email )
1301 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States
404-727-4934 (Phone)
404-727-6820 (Fax)
University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law ( email )
P.O. Box 117625
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625
United States
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