Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2330642
 


 



The Existential Function of Interpretation in International Law


Duncan B. Hollis


Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

September 24, 2013

Interpretation in International Law (Andrea Bianchi, Daniel Peat & Matthew Windsor, eds., Oxford University Press 2014)
Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2013-43

Abstract:     
For most international lawyers, interpretation involves acts giving meaning to a particular legal rule. Interpretative studies center largely on questions of method and technique – by what process should (or must) meaning be given to an international legal rule and how does a given meaning accord with the interpretative method employed. In recent years, increasing methodological awareness of interpretative theory has broadened – or, in the case of critical scholarship, challenged – the capacity of interpretation to give meaning to international law.

Notwithstanding the value in focusing on interpretative methods and techniques, the concept of interpretation they produce remains incomplete. International law’s interpretative processes are like an iceberg – the meaning arrived at by an interpreter is not simply a function of the method and technique employed (the visible tip) but rests on an array of earlier choices about what "exists" to be interpreted in the first place (the iceberg’s hidden, critical mass). A familiar example involves the question of what evidence counts as "State practice" for purposes of identifying customary international law. Interpreters who only count what States "do" may generate different content for a claimed rule than those who also consider what States "say" about the rule, even holding constant the method and technique employed. Similar existential questions arise throughout the international legal order. Before a treaty can be interpreted according to the 1969 Vienna Convention, for example, the interpreter must conclude the treaty actually exists. Indeed, interpretative choices lie at the core of international law’s sources doctrine, since what qualifies as international law (or not) can privilege or foreclose specific interpretative methods and outcomes.

This paper seeks to uncover the "existential function" of interpretation in international law. It explains how all interpretations have existential effects as they create, confirm, or deny the existence of the subject of interpretation. At the same time, I identify a particular structure of interpretative argument – what I call "existential interpretation" – by which interpreters ascertain the existence of their subjects. I review examples of this phenomenon in questions about the existence of interpretative authority, evidence, international law, and its sources.

Existential interpretations and the functions they serve have significant implications for international legal (a) discourse, (b) doctrine, and (c) theories of international law. Existential interpretations delineate the boundaries for interpretative discourse, narrowing it in cases of consensus on the existence of the interpreted subject, and broadening it in cases of dispute. Where interpretative resolutions of existential questions are possible, they may impact the content of international law doctrine, either directly or indirectly. And, where resolution is not possible, existential interpretations may operate as proxies for theoretical disagreement about the nature or purpose of international law (e.g., positivists may insist interpreters exclude from their toolbox the same soft law sources that naturalists insist require effectiveness as a matter of right). The paper concludes with a call for further study of existential interpretation given its importance to practice as well as its potential to provide a new lens for mapping the unity and fragmentation of the international legal order itself.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 35

Keywords: existential interpretation, treaty, treaties, interpretation, treaty interpretation, sources doctrine, international law, international discourse, dispute resolution, secondary rules, international legal theory, positivism, naturalism, principle agent theory, Syria, responsibility to protect

JEL Classification: K33, K42

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: September 26, 2013 ; Last revised: February 27, 2014

Suggested Citation

Hollis, Duncan B., The Existential Function of Interpretation in International Law (September 24, 2013). Interpretation in International Law (Andrea Bianchi, Daniel Peat & Matthew Windsor, eds., Oxford University Press 2014); Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2013-43. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2330642 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2330642

Contact Information

Duncan B. Hollis (Contact Author)
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 976
Downloads: 256
Download Rank: 68,307

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.719 seconds