Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2338161
 


 



Those Who Know, Those Who Don’t, and Those Who Know Better: Balancing Complexity, Sophistication, and Accuracy on Tax Returns


Michelle Drumbl


Washington and Lee University School of Law

October 9, 2013

Pittsburgh Tax Review, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2013
Washington & Lee Legal Studies Paper No. 2013-18

Abstract:     
Refundable credits, particularly the earned income tax credit (EITC) and the child tax credit, serve an important anti-poverty measure for low-income taxpayers. Annually, millions of taxpayers who do not owe any federal income tax must file a tax return in order to claim these credits that are in the nature of social benefits. The eligibility requirements for refundable credits are complex, and these returns are particularly prone to audit: EITC audits comprise one-third of all individual income tax audits. Because of the large dollar amounts at stake, a taxpayer’s mistaken understanding of the eligibility requirements for these refundable credits can often result in a deficiency of several thousand dollars. Though studies indicate that taxpayer error is more commonly inadvertent than intentional, the section 6662 20% accuracy-related penalty applies once the deficiency reaches a statutory “understatement” threshold; it is imposed computationally and without regard to the taxpayer’s intent.

By statute, taxpayers have the right to contest the accuracy-related penalty by demonstrating that there was reasonable cause for the underlying error and the taxpayer acted in good faith. Treasury regulations provide that such a circumstance might include “an honest misunderstanding of fact or law that is reasonable in light of all the facts and circumstances, including the experience, knowledge, and education of the taxpayer”. Yet for all of these reasons – lack of experience, lack of knowledge, and relative lack of education – the taxpayer is unlikely to have the knowledge or resources to raise the very defense that is meant to protect an unsophisticated taxpayer.

Drawing comparisons between refundable tax credits and social programs administered by other agencies, this article calls upon the IRS to better differentiate between inadvertent error (“those who don’t know”) and intentional or fraudulent error (“those who know better”). The article argues that the current accuracy-related penalty approach is unduly punitive. It concludes by proposing solutions that the IRS might consider in light of Congress’s desire for the Service to administer these social benefits through the Internal Revenue Code.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 66

Keywords: accuracy-related penalty, earned income credit, refundable credit, complexity

JEL Classification: K10, K34

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: October 11, 2013 ; Last revised: April 18, 2014

Suggested Citation

Drumbl, Michelle, Those Who Know, Those Who Don’t, and Those Who Know Better: Balancing Complexity, Sophistication, and Accuracy on Tax Returns (October 9, 2013). Pittsburgh Tax Review, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2013; Washington & Lee Legal Studies Paper No. 2013-18. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2338161

Contact Information

Michelle Drumbl (Contact Author)
Washington and Lee University School of Law ( email )
Lexington, VA 24450
United States
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