Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2338924
 


 



Doing as They Would Do: How the Perceived Ethical Preferences of Third-Party Beneficiaries Impact Ethical Decision-Making


Scott S. Wiltermuth


University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business

Victor Bennett


Duke University - Fuqua School of Business; University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business

Lamar Pierce


Washington University, Saint Louis - John M. Olin School of Business

October 9, 2013

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 122, 280-290

Abstract:     
Although unethical behavior often benefits third-parties not directly complicit in the misconduct, not all beneficiaries welcome these ill-gotten benefits. We investigate whether actors consider the ethical preferences of potential beneficiaries or rely solely on their own ethical predispositions when making decisions that affect others. Three studies demonstrate that the perceived ethical preferences of these beneficiaries can substantially influence the likelihood that actors behave unethically on their behalves. These studies show that actors consider the ethical preferences of beneficiaries only when their own ethical disposition is outcome-based.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 44

Keywords: Ethics, Prosocial, Decision-Making, Moral Orientation, Ethical Predisposition

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Date posted: October 13, 2013 ; Last revised: December 11, 2013

Suggested Citation

Wiltermuth, Scott S. and Bennett, Victor and Pierce, Lamar, Doing as They Would Do: How the Perceived Ethical Preferences of Third-Party Beneficiaries Impact Ethical Decision-Making (October 9, 2013). Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 122, 280-290. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2338924 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2338924

Contact Information

Scott S. Wiltermuth (Contact Author)
University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business ( email )
701 Exposition Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Victor Bennett
Duke University - Fuqua School of Business ( email )
Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States
University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business ( email )
701 Exposition Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
Lamar Pierce
Washington University, Saint Louis - John M. Olin School of Business ( email )
One Brookings Drive
Campus Box 1133
St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
United States
314-935-5205 (Phone)
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