Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2369654
 


 



Climate Adaptation and Land Use Governance: The Vertical Axis


Alice Kaswan


University of San Francisco - School of Law

March 20, 2014

Columbia Journal of Environmental Law Vol. 39, No. 2014, Forthcoming

Abstract:     
The existing and expected impacts of climate change are increasingly well-documented. Recent hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves provide dramatic examples of what climate change portends, even if no single event can be directly attributed to climate change. The scale of anticipated climate change poses profound challenges to existing governance norms. This article addresses one of those norms: the norm of local control over land use. The article provides three central contributions to environmental governance scholarship: First, it provides an in-depth assessment of the federalism values that guide jurisdictional choices: pragmatic efficacy, democratic legitimacy, and the prevention of tyranny. Second, based on those values, it argues that a multilevel governance approach that supplements local control with federal resources and parameters is necessary to adequately prepare for climate change and meet the wide range of local, state, and federal interests at stake. Third, it sketches how a multigovernance approach could distribute central governance functions among federal, state, and local players.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 68

Keywords: climate change, global warming, land use, climate adaptation, federalism

working papers series


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Date posted: December 19, 2013 ; Last revised: March 22, 2014

Suggested Citation

Kaswan, Alice, Climate Adaptation and Land Use Governance: The Vertical Axis (March 20, 2014). Columbia Journal of Environmental Law Vol. 39, No. 2014, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2369654 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2369654

Contact Information

Alice Kaswan (Contact Author)
University of San Francisco - School of Law ( email )
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117
United States
(415) 422-5053 (Phone)
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