Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2377826
 


 



Do U.S. Regulators Listen to the Public?: Testing the Regulatory Process with the RegRank Algorithm


Andrei A. Kirilenko


Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Sloan School of Management

Shawn Mankad


University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business

George Michailidis


University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

January 11, 2014

Robert H. Smith School Research Paper

Abstract:     
According to the U.S. Constitution, the government cannot harm a single individual without "the due process of the law." Things are different, however, if a government action affects multiple individuals. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the government can issue a regulation that can greatly harm many businesses and individuals "without giving them a chance to be heard." A federal statute called the Administrative Procedure Act mandates that federal regulatory agencies give the public a chance to comment on proposed regulations before they become final. We propose a new analytical tool called RegRank that can be used to measure and test whether government regulatory agencies actually adjust final rules in response to comments received from the public. We use RegRank to analyze the text of public rulemaking documents of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) - a federal regulatory agency in charge of implementing parts of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. We then test whether the regulatory agency adjusts final rules in the direction of sentiment expressed in public comments. We find strong evidence that it does. We also find, however, that the government adjusts its final rules almost entirely in response to comments from industry insiders. This begs a question: If the government only listens to industry insiders, does it even mater if the public has an opportunity to comment? We find that the answer is a resounding yes. A proposed regulation is much more likely to become final after a public comment period if there is a stronger consensus among the commenters and if there are comments that reflect organized public efforts. We posit that the RegRank algorithm can empower the public to test whether it has been given the "due process" and to keep an alphabet soup of government agencies in check.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 15

JEL Classification: H10, K23, C19

working papers series


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Date posted: January 12, 2014 ; Last revised: March 28, 2014

Suggested Citation

Kirilenko, Andrei A. and Mankad, Shawn and Michailidis, George, Do U.S. Regulators Listen to the Public?: Testing the Regulatory Process with the RegRank Algorithm (January 11, 2014). Robert H. Smith School Research Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2377826 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2377826

Contact Information

Andrei A. Kirilenko
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Sloan School of Management ( email )
100 Main Street
E62-612
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States
HOME PAGE: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/faculty/detail.php?in_spseqno=54152
Shawn Mankad (Contact Author)
University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business ( email )
Robert H. Smith School of Business
4313 Van Munching Hall
College Park, MD 20815
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/faculty/smankad
George Michailidis
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor ( email )
701 Tappan St. Rm E2600
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States
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