Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2378568
 


 



Student Privacy and Cloud Computing at the District Level: Next Steps and Key Issues


Alicia Solow-Niederman


Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society

Leah Plunkett


Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society; University of New Hampshire School of Law (formerly Franklin Pierce Law Center)

Urs Gasser


Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society; University of St. Gallen

January 15, 2014

Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2014-1

Abstract:     
This report offers recommended next steps and prioritizes open issues in the K-12 edtech space, with a special emphasis on two topics: (1) law and policy and (2) norms, values, attitudes, and practices, as well as an overarching eye to opportunities for collaboration. It builds from and reflects upon a conversation co-organized by the the Berkman Center for Internet & Society’s Student Privacy Initiative and the Consortium for School Networking, at which policymakers and educational technology thought leaders came together to emphasize the view “on the ground” as seen from the district level and identify specific resources for potential inclusion in a toolkit for diverse stakeholders considering the adoption and impact of cloud technologies in K-12 educational contexts.

The results of this conversation, synthesized in the body of this report, reflect considerable consensus around the main areas in need of attention in the dynamic edtech landscape, as well as how best to approach such work. A number of organizations and educational entities are already independently developing content and adopting processes around cloud technology in K-12 contexts to both support learning innovations and protect student privacy. Likely next steps — via independent efforts and ongoing collaboration among interested stakeholders — center on education, communication, and the creation and dissemination of general guidance documents and other similar resources that could support the development of shared good practices. Empirical data, current school and district policies and practices, legal and policy considerations, and technological developments should inform many of these efforts, and some open issues may require additional research, regulation, and/or coordination across parties to resolve. One particularly central process question moving forward involves the best mode(s) of multi-stakeholder collaboration and communications.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

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Date posted: January 16, 2014  

Suggested Citation

Solow-Niederman, Alicia and Plunkett, Leah and Gasser, Urs, Student Privacy and Cloud Computing at the District Level: Next Steps and Key Issues (January 15, 2014). Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2014-1. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2378568 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2378568

Contact Information

Alicia Solow-Niederman
Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society ( email )
Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
HOME PAGE: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/aliciasn
Leah Plunkett
Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society ( email )
Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
University of New Hampshire School of Law ( email )
Two White Street
Concord, NH 03301
United States
Urs Gasser (Contact Author)
Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society ( email )
Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
HOME PAGE: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/ugasser.html
University of St. Gallen ( email )
Research Center for Information Law
Blumenbergplatz 9
CH-9000 St.Gallen
Switzerland
HOME PAGE: www.fir.unisg.ch
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