Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=241067
 
 

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Household Specialization And The Male Marriage Wage Premium


Joni Hersch


Vanderbilt University - Law School; Vanderbilt University - Owen Graduate School of Management; Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics

Leslie S. Stratton


Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

October 2000

Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 54, pp. 78-94, October 2000

Abstract:     
Empirical research has consistently shown that married men have substantially higher wages, on average, than otherwise similar unmarried men. One commonly cited hypothesis to explain this pattern is that marriage allows one spouse to specialize in market production and the other to specialize in home production, enabling the former - usually the husband - to acquire more market-specific human capital and, ultimately, earn higher wages. The authors test this hypothesis using panel data from the National Survey of Families and Households. The data reveal that married men spent virtually the same amount of time on home production as did single men, albeit on different types of housework. Estimates from a fixed effects wage equation indicate that the male marriage wage premium is not substantially affected by controls for home production activities. Household specialization, the authors conclude, does not appear to have been responsible for the marriage premium in this sample.

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Date posted: October 27, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Hersch, Joni and Stratton, Leslie S., Household Specialization And The Male Marriage Wage Premium (October 2000). Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 54, pp. 78-94, October 2000. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=241067 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.241067

Contact Information

Joni Hersch (Contact Author)
Vanderbilt University - Law School ( email )
131 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203-1181
United States
615-343-7717 (Phone)
615-322-6631 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://law.vanderbilt.edu/go/phdlawecon
Vanderbilt University - Owen Graduate School of Management
401 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203
United States
Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics
Box 1819 Station B
Nashville, TN 37235
United States
Leslie S. Stratton
Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )
Box 844000
Richmond, VA 23284-4000
United States
804-828-7141 (Phone)
804-828-1719 (Fax)
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany
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References:  16
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