Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2430265
 


 



Procedural Rights at Sentencing


Carissa Byrne Hessick


University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

F. Andrew Hessick


University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

April 28, 2014

Notre Dame Law Review, Vol. 90, 2014 Forthcoming
University of Utah College of Law Research Paper, No. 80

Abstract:     
In determining which constitutional procedural rights apply at sentencing, courts have distinguished between mandatory and discretionary sentencing systems. For mandatory systems ― systems that limit sentencing factors and specify particular punishments based on particular facts ― defendants enjoy important rights including the right to a jury, the right to proof beyond a reasonable doubt, the right to notice of potential sentencing aggravators, and the right not to be sentence based on ex post facto laws. By contrast, for discretionary systems ― systems that leave the determination of sentencing factors and how much punishment to impose based on particular facts to the judge’s discretion ― defendants do not enjoy these protections. This Article challenges this discrepancy. It argues that, given the rationales underlying each of these rights, there is equal reason to apply these rights in discretionary sentencing systems as in mandatory ones. As it explains, procedural rights regulate the means by which facts are found and the manner in which courts use those facts, and consequently are critical to discretionary systems. Just as in mandatory sentencing systems, judges in discretionary systems must make factual findings to determine the appropriate sentence to impose. The Article argues that the various justifications for providing fewer procedures in discretionary schemes are based on misconceptions about the nature of discretion at sentencing and inaccurate historical analysis.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 54

Keywords: criminal sentencing, trial rights, constiutional rights, judicial discretion, United States v. Booker, Sixth Amendment, Due Process, jury trial right, Ex Post Facto Clause, proof beyond a reasonable doubt

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Date posted: April 29, 2014 ; Last revised: June 14, 2014

Suggested Citation

Hessick, Carissa Byrne and Hessick, F. Andrew, Procedural Rights at Sentencing (April 28, 2014). Notre Dame Law Review, Vol. 90, 2014 Forthcoming; University of Utah College of Law Research Paper, No. 80. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2430265

Contact Information

Carissa Byrne Hessick (Contact Author)
University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )
332 S. 1400 East Front
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States
F. Andrew Hessick
University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )
332 S. 1400 East Front
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States
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