Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=251495
 
 

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Should Private Discrimination Constitute an Act Discreditable to the Profession? A Philosophical Look at a Practical Ethical Question


Robert W. McGee


Fayetteville State University


As published in Journal of Accounting, Ethics & Public Policy, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 681-687, Fall 1998

Abstract:     
Rule 501 of the AICPA's Code of Professional Conduct prohibits acts that are discreditable to the profession. Discrimination in employment practices is considered to be an act that is discreditable to the profession. This article looks at the philosophical and practical questions that arise when one digs beneath the surface of Rule 501 in an attempt to determine whether private discrimination should be classified as an act that is discreditable to the profession. The author also explores the general concept of what might be considered an act that is discreditable to the profession and questions whether there should be such a rule that prohibits personal conduct that does not violate rights.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 7

Keywords: Acts discreditable, Rule 501, Accounting, Ethics, Discrimination

JEL Classification: K2, J7, D63, M4

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Date posted: January 27, 2001  

Suggested Citation

McGee, Robert W., Should Private Discrimination Constitute an Act Discreditable to the Profession? A Philosophical Look at a Practical Ethical Question. As published in Journal of Accounting, Ethics & Public Policy, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 681-687, Fall 1998. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=251495 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.251495

Contact Information

Robert W. McGee (Contact Author)
Fayetteville State University ( email )
School of Business and Economics
Fayetteville, NC 28301
United States
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