Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=253089
 


 



Firm-Specific Human Capital, Job Matching, And Turnover: Evidence From Major League Baseball, 1900-1992


A. Glenn


American University in Bulgaria

Joseph McGarrity


University of Central Arkansas - Department of Economics and Finance

Jim Weller


University of Central Arkansas


Economic Inquiry, Vol. 39, Issue 1, January 2001

Abstract:     
The two dominant labor market turnover hypotheses, the firm-specific human capital model (FSHCM) and the job-matching model, suggest different patterns of player mobility in major league baseball. The matching hypothesis predicts greater mobility of players in positions that require substantial team production. A better match may offer large productivity gains. Alternately, the FSHCM predicts players in positions requiring the greatest amount of teamwork will benefit from specific knowledge, making them less likely to change teams. We examine the frequency distribution of trades by player position from 1900-1992 and find the FSHCM provides the best explanation for turnover in this industry.

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: August 17, 2001  

Suggested Citation

Glenn, A. and McGarrity, Joseph and Weller, Jim, Firm-Specific Human Capital, Job Matching, And Turnover: Evidence From Major League Baseball, 1900-1992. Economic Inquiry, Vol. 39, Issue 1, January 2001. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=253089

Contact Information

A. Glenn
American University in Bulgaria ( email )
Blagoevgrad, 2700
Bulgaria
011 359 73 88458 (Phone)
011 359 73 80828 (Fax)
Joseph McGarrity (Contact Author)
University of Central Arkansas - Department of Economics and Finance ( email )
Conway, AR 72032
United States
501-450-5330 (Phone)
501-450-5330 (Fax)
Jim Weller
University of Central Arkansas ( email )
Conway, AR 72032
United States
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