Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2705592
 


 



Let Hunger Be Your Guide? Being Hungry Before a Meal is Associated with Healthier Levels of Post-Meal Blood Glucose


David Gal


University of Illinois at Chicago

December 18, 2015

Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, 1:1, 2016, Forthcoming

Abstract:     
Accumulating evidence suggests that when people eat might be as important for their health as what or how much they eat. Consumers initiate eating behavior in response to a number of factors including time of day, food availability, and hunger. The present research examines whether feeling hungry might reflect a time at which it is relatively healthy for individuals to initiate eating. Specifically, the present research examines whether differences in hunger predict differences in an important health measure, namely post-meal blood glucose. The results show that post-meal blood glucose is highest when people are not at all hungry and relatively lower when people are moderately hungry or very hungry. When people are very hungry, post-meal glucose is not lower and possibly slightly higher than when people are moderately hungry. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, from a health standpoint, it is beneficial to eat when moderately hungry.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 31

Keywords: hunger, blood glucose, meal timing, intuitive eating

JEL Classification: I10


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Date posted: December 20, 2015  

Suggested Citation

Gal, David, Let Hunger Be Your Guide? Being Hungry Before a Meal is Associated with Healthier Levels of Post-Meal Blood Glucose (December 18, 2015). Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, 1:1, 2016, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2705592

Contact Information

David Gal (Contact Author)
University of Illinois at Chicago ( email )
1200 W Harrison St
Chicago, IL 60607
United States
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