Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=278117
 
 

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Inequality and Happiness: Are Europeans and Americans Different?


Alberto F. Alesina


Harvard University - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Rafael Di Tella


Harvard Business School - Business, Government and the International Economy Unit; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Robert MacCulloch


Imperial College London - Tanaka Business School

July 2001

CEPR Discussion Paper No. 2877

Abstract:     
The answer to the question posed in the title is "yes." Using a total of 128,106 answers to a survey question about "happiness," we find that there is a large, negative and significant effect of inequality on happiness in Europe but not in the US. There are two potential explanations. First, Europeans prefer more equal societies (inequality belongs in the utility function for Europeans but not for Americans). Second, social mobility is (or is perceived to be) higher in the US so being poor is not seen as affecting future income. We test these hypotheses by partitioning the sample across income and ideological lines. There is evidence of "inequality generated" unhappiness in the US only for a sub-group of rich leftists. In Europe inequality makes the poor unhappy, as well as the leftists. This favors the hypothesis that inequality affects European happiness because of their lower social mobility (since no preference for equality exists amongst the rich or the right). The results help explain the greater popular demand for government to fight inequality in Europe relative to the US.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 40

Keywords: Inequality, happiness, redistribution

JEL Classification: D31, J11, N33, N34

working papers series


Date posted: July 31, 2001  

Suggested Citation

Alesina, Alberto F. and Di Tella, Rafael and MacCulloch, Robert, Inequality and Happiness: Are Europeans and Americans Different? (July 2001). CEPR Discussion Paper No. 2877. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=278117

Contact Information

Alberto F. Alesina (Contact Author)
Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )
Littauer Center
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-8388 (Phone)
617-495-7730 (Fax)
Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)
77 Bastwick Street
London, EC1V 3PZ
United Kingdom
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Rafael Di Tella
Harvard Business School - Business, Government and the International Economy Unit ( email )
Cambridge, MA
United States
617-495-5048 (Phone)
617-496-5985 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.people.hbs.edu/rditella/
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Robert MacCulloch
Imperial College London - Tanaka Business School ( email )
South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London SW7 2AZ, DC SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom
Feedback to SSRN


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Citations:  138
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