Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=305882
 


 



Making Poor Mothers Fungible: The Privatization of Foster Care


Barbara Bennett Woodhouse


Emory University School of Law; University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law


CHILD CARE AND INEQUALITY: RE-THINKING CAREWORK FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH, Routledge Press, Forthcoming 2002

Abstract:     
Woodhouse's chapter in this book explores the history in America of publicly funded fostering as a response to family disruption. It examines the impact of new federal legislation that radically shifts the emphasis away from the support of biological families (through fostering) to a policy favoring dissolution of disrupted families and the creation of new families (through adoption). Her chapter analyzes the positives and negatives of this new policy and concludes that, while the objective of assuring that all children have a safe and permanent home is a worthy one, the new reforms run a severe risk of treating women engaged in mothering - particularly poor women and women of color - as fungible commodities that can be interchanged without cost to child, parent, or society.

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: October 25, 2002  

Suggested Citation

Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett, Making Poor Mothers Fungible: The Privatization of Foster Care. CHILD CARE AND INEQUALITY: RE-THINKING CAREWORK FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH, Routledge Press, Forthcoming 2002. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=305882

Contact Information

Barbara Bennett Woodhouse (Contact Author)
Emory University School of Law ( email )
1301 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States
404-727-4934 (Phone)
404-727-6820 (Fax)
University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law ( email )
P.O. Box 117625
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625
United States
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