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Wages, Productivity, and Work Intensity in the Great Depression


Julia Darby


University of Strathclyde, Glasgow - Strathclyde Business School - Department of Economics

Robert A. Hart


University of Stirling - Department of Economics; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

August 2002

IZA Discussion Paper No. 543

Abstract:     
We show that U.S. manufacturing wages during the Great Depression were importantly determined by forces on firms' intensive margins. Short-run changes in work intensity and the longer-term goal of restoring full potential productivity combined to influence real wage growth. By contrast, the external effects of unemployment and replacement rates had much less impact. Empirical work is undertaken against the background of an efficient bargaining model that embraces employment, hours of work and work intensity.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 24

Keywords: Wages, Productivity, Work Intensity, Great Depression

JEL Classification: J24, J31, N62

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Date posted: August 29, 2002  

Suggested Citation

Darby, Julia and Hart, Robert A., Wages, Productivity, and Work Intensity in the Great Depression (August 2002). IZA Discussion Paper No. 543. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=323597

Contact Information

Julia Darby
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow - Strathclyde Business School - Department of Economics ( email )
Sir William Duncan Building
130 Rottenrow
Glasgow, G4 0GE
United Kingdom
HOME PAGE: http://www.economics.strath.ac.uk/julia/
Robert A. Hart (Contact Author)
University of Stirling - Department of Economics ( email )
Stirling, Scotland FK9 4LA
United Kingdom
+44 1786 467 471 (Phone)
+44 1786 467 469 (Fax)
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany
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