Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=395581
 
 

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Recurring Nightmare: Barriers to Effective Treatment of Hiv in the United States and Internationally


John G. Culhane


Widener University - Delaware Campus


John Marshall Law Review, Vol. 35, 2002

Abstract:     
Developing nations face many of the same barriers to the effective prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS as the developed nations. The article examines successful and unsuccessful approaches to prevention in the United States, and compares these to the obstacles faced by those attempting to deal with the HIV/AIDS pandemic in other nations. It suggests ways of addressing deeply rooted obstacles such as the treatment of women and racial and sexual minorities. A complex web of approaches that draws on international, national, and local laws and government, as well as the participation of community groups, stands the only chance of substantially addressing the myriad problems HIV/AIDS presents.
The article also addresses the assumption that treatment of most of the world's HIV-infected population is an impossibility, and draws on two existing studies to suggest that the barriers are not as insurmountable as is sometimes thought. Substantial global commitment to funding, however, is necessary for both prevention and treatment.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 7

Keywords: HIV, AIDS, barriers, treatment, prevention, discrimination, sexual orientation, women, stigma, United States, Brazil, Kenya, Uganda, Haiti, CDC, Satcher, Cambodia, Baltimore

JEL Classification: H4, H5, I1

Accepted Paper Series


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Date posted: April 16, 2003 ; Last revised: February 23, 2010

Suggested Citation

Culhane, John G., Recurring Nightmare: Barriers to Effective Treatment of Hiv in the United States and Internationally. John Marshall Law Review, Vol. 35, 2002. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=395581

Contact Information

John G. Culhane (Contact Author)
Widener University - Delaware Campus ( email )
PO Box 7474
Wilmington, DE 19803
United States
(302) 477-2107 (Phone)
(302) 477-2255 (Fax)
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