Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=461535
 
 

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Liquidity Shortages and Banking Crises


Douglas W. Diamond


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Raghuram G. Rajan


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; International Monetary Fund (IMF); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

August 2003


Abstract:     
We show in this paper that bank failures can be contagious. Unlike earlier work where contagion stems from depositor panics or ex ante contractual links between banks, we argue bank failures can shrink the common pool of liquidity, creating or exacerbating aggregate liquidity shortages. This could lead to a contagion of failures and a possible total meltdown of the system. Given the costs of a meltdown, there is a possible role for government intervention. Unfortunately, liquidity problems and solvency problems interact and can cause each other, making it hard to determine the root cause of a crisis from observable factors. We propose a robust sequence of intervention.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 43

Keywords: Liquidity, Crises, Banking

JEL Classification: G2, E5

working papers series


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Date posted: January 2, 2004  

Suggested Citation

Diamond, Douglas W. and Rajan, Raghuram G., Liquidity Shortages and Banking Crises (August 2003). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=461535 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.461535

Contact Information

Douglas W. Diamond (Contact Author)
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-7283 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/douglas.diamond/

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Raghuram G. Rajan
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-4437 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
International Monetary Fund (IMF) ( email )
700 19th Street NW
Washington, DC 20431
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
773-702-9299 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
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