Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=545662
 
 

References (61)



 
 

Citations (13)



 


 



Resource-Abundance and Economic Growth in the U.S.


Elissaios Papyrakis


VU University Amsterdam - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM)

Reyer Gerlagh


Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration

April 2004

FEEM Working Paper No. 62.04

Abstract:     
It is a common assumption that regions within the same country converge to approximately the same steady-state income levels. The so-called absolute convergence hypothesis focuses on initial income levels to account for the variability in income growth among regions. Empirical data seem to support the absolute convergence hypothesis for U.S. states, but the data also show that natural resource-abundance is a significant negative determinant of growth. We find that natural resource abundance decreases investment, schooling, openness, and R&D expenditure and increases corruption, and we show that these effects can fully explain the negative effect of natural resource abundance on growth.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 46

Keywords: Natural resources, Growth, Transmission channels

JEL Classification: C21, O13, O51, Q33

working papers series





Download This Paper

Date posted: May 24, 2004  

Suggested Citation

Papyrakis, Elissaios and Gerlagh, Reyer, Resource-Abundance and Economic Growth in the U.S. (April 2004). FEEM Working Paper No. 62.04. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=545662 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.545662

Contact Information

Elissaios Papyrakis (Contact Author)
VU University Amsterdam - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM) ( email )
De Boelelaan 1115
Amsterdam, 1081 HV
Netherlands
+31 20 44 49502 (Phone)
+31 20 44 49553 (Fax)
Reyer Gerlagh
Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration ( email )
P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, 5000 LE
Netherlands
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,636
Downloads: 170
Download Rank: 104,035
References:  61
Citations:  13

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo5 in 0.359 seconds