Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=597201
 
 

References (37)



 


 



The Macroeconomics of Delayed Exchange-Rate Unification: Theory and Evidence from Tanzania


Daniel Kaufmann


The Brookings Institution

Stephen A. O'Connell


Swarthmore College - Economics Department; University of Oxford - Centre for Study of African Economics

February 1999

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 2060

Abstract:     
A more aggressive move toward exchange-rate unification in Tanzania would have delivered a fiscal bonus by the mid-1980s' and unification of the exchange rate would have reduced monetary growth and inflationary pressures. From a fiscal viewpoint there was no economic rationale for gradualism in exchange-rate unification and delay of a move toward convertibility.

Parallel exchange-rate markets have often been dismissed by authorities as a nuisance or as the domain of a small group of economic saboteurs. Using Tanzania as a case study, Kaufmann and O'Connell argue instead that these markets played a central macroeconomic role in the 1970s and 1980s. They provide a rigorous macroeconomic analysis of the parallel foreign-exchange market and its fiscal implications.

First, they investigate the evolution of that market in Tanzania from the mid-1960s to 1990. That period stretched from the adoption of exchange controls to macroeconomic collapse and then to subsequent reforms in the mid- to late 1980s. A reduced-form econometric equation (of a Dornbusch stock-flow model type) indicates that both trade and financial portfolio factors were important in determining the parallel premium, with trade determinants dominating in the long run, as theory suggests.

Then they investigate the fiscal impact of the parallel exchange-rate premium, an issue emphasized in the literature on exchange-rate unification. They construct a counterfactual simulation of fiscal and balance-of-payments flows under alternative assumptions about the indexing of those flows to the parallel and official exchange rate. They find that a more aggressive move toward exchange-rate unification would have already delivered a fiscal bonus by the mid-1980s. Accordingly, unification of the exchange rate would have reduced monetary growth and inflationary pressures.

So, contrary to conventional advice often given in Africa and elsewhere, the case of Tanzania suggests that from a fiscal viewpoint there was no economic rationale for gradualism in exchange-rate unification and delay of a move toward convertibility.

This paper - a product of the Development Research Group and the Regulatory Reform and Private Enterprise Division, Economic Development Institute - is part of a larger effort by the Bank to investigate exchange rate regimes. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under research project The Macroeconomic Implications of Foreign Exchange Markets in Developing Countries (RPO 675-30). The paper also appears in M. Kiguel, J. Lizondo, and S. O'Connell, Parallel Exchange Rates in Developing Countries [London and New York, MacMillan and A. Martin].

Number of Pages in PDF File: 38

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: October 9, 2004  

Suggested Citation

Kaufmann, Daniel and O'Connell, Stephen A., The Macroeconomics of Delayed Exchange-Rate Unification: Theory and Evidence from Tanzania (February 1999). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 2060. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=597201

Contact Information

Daniel Kaufmann (Contact Author)
The Brookings Institution ( email )
1775 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
United States
202-797-6257 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.thekaufmannpost.net
Stephen A. O'Connell
Swarthmore College - Economics Department ( email )
Swarthmore, PA 19081
United States
610-328-8107 (Phone)
610-328-7352 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/soconne1/
University of Oxford - Centre for Study of African Economics
Wellington Square
Oxford OX1 3JP
United Kingdom
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,496
Downloads: 130
Download Rank: 130,191
References:  37

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.281 seconds