Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=619884
 
 

Footnotes (125)



 


 



Demonstrably Awful: The Right to Life and the Selective Non-Treatment of Disabled Babies and Young Children


Janet Read


University of Warwick - Department of Sociology

Luke Clements


University of Wales System - Cardiff Law School


Journal of Law and Society, Vol. 31, No. 4, pp. 482-509, December 2004

Abstract:     
Twenty-five years ago it was common practice to bring about the deaths of some children with learning disabilities or physical impairments. This paper considers a small number of landmark cases in the early 1980s that confronted this practice. These cases illustrate a process by which external forces (social, philosophical, political, and professional) moved through the legal system to effect a profound change outside that system - primarily in the (then) largely closed domain of medical conduct/practice. These cases are considered from a socio-legal perspective. In particular, the paper analyses the reasons why they surfaced at that time, the social and political contexts that shaped the judgments, and their legacy.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 28

Accepted Paper Series





Date posted: December 1, 2004  

Suggested Citation

Read, Janet and Clements, Luke, Demonstrably Awful: The Right to Life and the Selective Non-Treatment of Disabled Babies and Young Children. Journal of Law and Society, Vol. 31, No. 4, pp. 482-509, December 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=619884

Contact Information

Janet Read (Contact Author)
University of Warwick - Department of Sociology ( email )
Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom
+44 (0)24 7652 4140 (Phone)
Luke Clements
University of Wales System - Cardiff Law School ( email )
PO Box 427
Cardiff, Wales CF10 3AX
United Kingdom
+44 (0)29 208 74360 (Phone)
+44 (0)29 208 74097 (Fax)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,377
Downloads: 28
Footnotes:  125

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo2 in 0.297 seconds