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http://ssrn.com/abstract=622864
 
 

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Solutions to Japan's Banking Problems: What Might Work and What Definitely Will Fail


Anil K. Kashyap


University of Chicago, Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Takeo Hoshi


University of California at San Diego; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

November 2004

Stigler Center Working Paper

Abstract:     
We study the longstanding banking problems in Japan. By examining both the past policies in Japan that have failed, and the successful policies in other high income OECD countries that have overcome banking crises, we develop a roadmap for resolving the problems.

We distill the problems into four basic troubles. The first is that most of the banks are severely under-capitalized when their condition is properly evaluated. The second is that the banks are not currently allocating credit efficiently, and instead are directing many loans to borrowers that will not be able to repay them. The third is that the banking sector is too large (in terms of assets) to make adequate returns. The final problem is that the banks' lack of profitability is partly related to their inability to offer the high margin products that are commonplace amongst their foreign competitors.

We then explore the implications of these observations for the long-run condition of the industry. In particular, a natural way to define the end of the problems is when the banking sector has shrunk to a level where it can profitably operate and the banks are once again adequately capitalized and no-longer ever-greening loans to deadbeat borrowers. Recognizing this constellation of conditions as the eventual equilibrium for the industry is helpful because it identifies the set of problems that a successful policy must confront. Our description of the equilibrium also helps to show why past policies have failed to end the problems.

The evidence from other countries, however, shows that the problems are not insurmountable. We describe how the successful policies used elsewhere could be applied in Japan. We outline alternative transition strategies that could take us from the current conditions to the equilibrium. Finally, we illustrate the alternatives by analyzing the Resona Bank rescue and the Mitsubishi Tokyo Financial Group and UFJ merger.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 42

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Date posted: January 28, 2005  

Suggested Citation

Kashyap, Anil K. and Hoshi, Takeo, Solutions to Japan's Banking Problems: What Might Work and What Definitely Will Fail (November 2004). Stigler Center Working Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=622864 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.622864

Contact Information

Anil K. Kashyap (Contact Author)
University of Chicago, Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-7260 (Phone)
773 702-0458 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
773-702-7260 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago ( email )
230 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60604
United States
Takeo Hoshi
University of California at San Diego ( email )
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0519
United States
619-534-5018 (Phone)
619-534-3939 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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