Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=722281
 
 

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Police Patrols & Fire Alarms in the NAAEC


Kal Raustiala


University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law


Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review, Vol. 26, pp. 389-413, 2004

Abstract:     
A common critique of international agreements is that they lack enforcement and are weak. A key element of this purported weakness is the lack of effective monitoring of state compliance. This Article explores two modes of treaty monitoring: "police patrols" and "fire alarms." These concepts, drawn from the literature on congressional oversight in political science, are applied to the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, a side agreement to NAFTA. The Agreement is unusual in that it empowers private actors to bring direct complaints about noncompliance to an international organization, i.e., it creates a fire alarm for citizens and NGOs. The implications of this structure of treaty monitoring are analyzed, as are the reasons behind the creation of this treaty feature.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 26

Keywords: North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, environmental law enforcement, treaty monitoring

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Date posted: May 12, 2005  

Suggested Citation

Raustiala, Kal, Police Patrols & Fire Alarms in the NAAEC. Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review, Vol. 26, pp. 389-413, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=722281

Contact Information

Kal Raustiala (Contact Author)
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law ( email )
385 Charles E. Young Dr. East
Room 1242
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1476
United States
310-794-4856 (Phone)
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