Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=723308
 
 

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Trade Responses to Geographic Frictions: A Decomposition Using Micro-Data


Russell H. Hillberry


University of Melbourne - Department of Economics; World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

David L. Hummels


Purdue University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

May 2005

NBER Working Paper No. w11339

Abstract:     
A large literature has shown that geographic frictions reduce trade, but has not clarified precisely why. We provide insights into why such frictions matter by examining which parts of trade these frictions reduce most. Using data that tracks manufacturers' shipments within the United States on an exceptionally fine grid, we find that the pattern of shipments is extremely localized. Shipments within 5-digit zip codes, which have a median radius of just 4 miles, are 3 times larger than shipments outside the zip code. We decompose aggregate shipments into extensive and intensive margins, and show that distance and other frictions reduce aggregate trade values primarily by reducing the number of commodities shipped and the number of establishments shipping. We consider two broad reasons for these facts and conclude that trade in intermediate goods is the most likely explanation for highly localized shipments and the dominant role of the extensive margin. In addition, we find no evidence of state-level home bias when distances are measured precisely and trade is observed over a very fine grid.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 44

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Date posted: June 15, 2005  

Suggested Citation

Hillberry, Russell H. and Hummels, David L., Trade Responses to Geographic Frictions: A Decomposition Using Micro-Data (May 2005). NBER Working Paper No. w11339. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=723308

Contact Information

Russell H. Hillberry
University of Melbourne - Department of Economics ( email )
Melbourne, 3010
Australia
World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)
1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States
David L. Hummels (Contact Author)
Purdue University - Department of Economics ( email )
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1310
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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