Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=74128
 
 

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The Past and Future of Commercial Banking Viewed Through an Incomplete Contract Lens


Raghuram G. Rajan


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; International Monetary Fund (IMF); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)


Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Vol. 30, No. 3, Part 2 (August 1998)

Abstract:     
Commercial banks emerged at a time when contracts were very incomplete and property rights insecure. They typically offered demand deposits, made loans on demand, and were regulated. Each of these aspects of the institutional structure were essential in helping the bank provide the twin functions of liquidity and safety. I argue that recent theories of banking, which I collectively refer to as "Incomplete Contract" theories of banking, explain well the origins of banking. I also claim that they can explain recent changes in banking; as the informational, legal, and property rights environment has improved, there appear to be fewer synergies between various aspects of the traditional institutional structure of the bank. In developed countries, it is now time to think whether there is anything special about the institutional form of the bank, or whether all that is special is that it is regulated.

JEL Classification: G21

Accepted Paper Series





Not Available For Download

Date posted: April 6, 1998  

Suggested Citation

Rajan, Raghuram G., The Past and Future of Commercial Banking Viewed Through an Incomplete Contract Lens. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Vol. 30, No. 3, Part 2 (August 1998). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=74128

Contact Information

Raghuram G. Rajan (Contact Author)
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-4437 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
International Monetary Fund (IMF) ( email )
700 19th Street NW
Washington, DC 20431
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
773-702-9299 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
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