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http://ssrn.com/abstract=775997
 
 

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Separate When Equal? Racial Inequality and Residential Segregation


Patrick J. Bayer


Duke University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Hanming Fang


University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Robert McMillan


University of Toronto - Department of Economics

August 2005

NBER Working Paper No. w11507

Abstract:     
This paper hypothesizes that segregation in US cities increases as racial inequality narrows due to the emergence of middle-class black neighborhoods. Employing a novel research design based on life-cycle variations in the relationship between segregation and inequality, we test this hypothesis using the 1990 and 2000 Censuses. Indeed, increased black educational attainment in a city leads to a significant rise in the number of middle-class black communities and segregation for older adults both in the cross-section and over time, consistent with our hypothesis. These findings imply a negative feedback loop that inhibits reductions in racial inequality and segregation over time.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 51

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Date posted: May 25, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Bayer, Patrick J. and Fang, Hanming and McMillan, Robert, Separate When Equal? Racial Inequality and Residential Segregation (August 2005). NBER Working Paper No. w11507. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=775997

Contact Information

Patrick J. Bayer (Contact Author)
Duke University - Department of Economics ( email )
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Hanming Fang
University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )
3718 Locust Walk
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Robert McMillan
University of Toronto - Department of Economics ( email )
150 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G7
Canada
416-978-4190 (Phone)
416-978-6713 (Fax)
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