Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=845345
 
 

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Do We Need Unicorns When We Have Law?


Rory O'Connell


University of Ulster - Transitional Justice Institute


Ratio Juris, Vol. 18, pp. 484-503, 2005
Queen's University Belfast Law Research Paper

Abstract:     
Theoretical justifications of human rights have been troubled by many criticisms and objections. It has been objected that the source of human rights is unclear as is the meaning attached to human rights. Yet today many human rights have been adopted in positive law. Law students today need to learn about this positive law of human rights and may consider that those debates in human rights theory are pointless.

This article examines the extent to which the positive law of human rights answers these questions satisfactorily. It concludes that positive law offers several important answers to these criticisms, but suggests they cannot replace the need for a normative justification. The article concludes that approaches which integrate theory and positive law are fruitful avenues of inquiry.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 27

Keywords: Human Rights, Legal Theory, Jurisprudence, Philosophy of Law

JEL Classification: K10

Accepted Paper Series


Date posted: November 14, 2005 ; Last revised: June 7, 2012

Suggested Citation

O'Connell, Rory, Do We Need Unicorns When We Have Law?. Ratio Juris, Vol. 18, pp. 484-503, 2005; Queen's University Belfast Law Research Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=845345

Contact Information

Rory O'Connell (Contact Author)
University of Ulster - Transitional Justice Institute ( email )
Shore Road
Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37 OQB
Northern Ireland
HOME PAGE: http://www.transitionaljustice.ulster.ac.uk/

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