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How the West Was Won: The De-institutionalization of Child-Labor in Pakistan's Soccer Ball Industry


Farzad R. Khan


Lahore University of Management Sciences - Suleman Dawood School of Business

Kamal Munir


University of Cambridge - Judge Business School

December 7, 2005


Abstract:     
Organizational fields in developing countries often experience diffusion of practices that, while novel for them, are highly institutionalized in the West. Studying such instances of change, which involve both non-isomorphic and isomorphic elements, sheds new light on the role of institutional entrepreneurs and highlights the crucial importance of identifying and incorporating the unintended consequences of institutional change into our analyses. Specifically, our study of the campaign to eliminate child labour in Pakistan's soccer ball manufacturing industry reveals how institutional entrepreneurs mediated between the powerless and the powerful. It also highlights how, in the wake of this universally acknowledged success story, bigger problems were created for many weak members of the field, especially women.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 41

Keywords: institutional theory, child labour, institutional entrepreneurship, pakistan

JEL Classification: A13, J13, M14

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Date posted: February 17, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Khan, Farzad R. and Munir, Kamal, How the West Was Won: The De-institutionalization of Child-Labor in Pakistan's Soccer Ball Industry (December 7, 2005). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=882395 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.882395

Contact Information

Farzad R. Khan
Lahore University of Management Sciences - Suleman Dawood School of Business ( email )
S.S. 100 Km 18
Lahore, BA 70010
Pakistan
Kamal Munir (Contact Author)
University of Cambridge - Judge Business School ( email )
Trumpington Street
Cambridge, CB2 1AG
United Kingdom
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