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http://ssrn.com/abstract=909294
 
 

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Path Dependence in the Development of U.S. Bankruptcy Law, 1880-1938


Mary Hansen


American University - Department of Economics

Bradley A. Hansen


University of Mary Washington - Department of Economics


Journal of Institutional Economics, Forthcoming

Abstract:     
We illustrate mechanisms that can give rise to path dependence in legislation. Specifically, we show how debtor-friendly bankruptcy law arose in the United States as a result of a path dependent process. The 1898 Bankruptcy Act was not regarded as debtor-friendly at the time of its enactment, but the enactment of the law gave rise to changes in interest groups, changes in beliefs about the purpose of bankruptcy law, and changes in the Democratic Party's position on bankruptcy that set the United States on a path to debtor-friendly bankruptcy law. An analysis of the path dependence of bankruptcy law produces an interpretation that is more consistent with the evidence than the conventional interpretation that debtor-friendliness in bankruptcy law began with political compromises to obtain the 1898 Bankruptcy Act.

Keywords: path dependence, legislative change, bankruptcy law, interest groups, ideology

JEL Classification: N42

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: June 17, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Hansen, Mary and Hansen, Bradley A., Path Dependence in the Development of U.S. Bankruptcy Law, 1880-1938. Journal of Institutional Economics, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=909294

Contact Information

Mary Hansen
American University - Department of Economics ( email )
4400 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20016-8029
United States
Bradley A. Hansen (Contact Author)
University of Mary Washington - Department of Economics ( email )
1301 College Avenue
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
United States
(540) 654-1484 (Phone)
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