Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=910958
 
 

Footnotes (233)



 


 



Neuroscience Evidence, Legal Culture, and Criminal Procedure


Michael S. Pardo


University of Alabama School of Law


American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 33, p. 301, 2006
U of Alabama Public Law Research Paper No. 910958

Abstract:     
Proposed lie-detection technology based on neuroscience poses significant challenges for the law. The law must respond to the science with an adequate understanding of such evidence, its significance, and its limitations. This paper makes three contributions toward those ends. First, it provides an account of the preliminary neuroscience research underlying this proposed evidence. Second, it discusses the nature and significance of such evidence, how such evidence would fit with legal practices and concepts, and its potential admissibility. Finally, it analyzes the constitutional protections that may limit the compelled production of such evidence.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 38

Keywords: neuroscience, fMRI, lie detection, deception, prior knowledge, fourth amendment, fifth amendment, self-incrimination

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: June 25, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Pardo, Michael S., Neuroscience Evidence, Legal Culture, and Criminal Procedure. American Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 33, p. 301, 2006; U of Alabama Public Law Research Paper No. 910958. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=910958

Contact Information

Michael S. Pardo (Contact Author)
University of Alabama School of Law ( email )
P.O. Box 870382
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 3,138
Downloads: 634
Download Rank: 21,684
Footnotes:  233

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.469 seconds