Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=913415
 
 

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Private Securities Litigation and the Courts: Positive Political Theory and Evidence


Emerson H. Tiller


Northwestern University - School of Law

Albert Yoon


University of Toronto - Faculty of Law

June 30, 2006

1st Annual Conference on Empirical Legal Studies Paper

Abstract:     
This paper incorporates insights from Positive Political Theory to examine the role of legislative reform on judicially created legal doctrines relating to private securities litigation. The study bears on the general question of how Congress can influence the use of legal doctrines within a judicial hierarchy. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 on the use of the "Group Pleading Doctrine" and "Fraud on the Market" theory - two doctrines that assisted plaintiff-investors in overcoming the strict federal pleading requirements for bringing their claims in federal court.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 29

Keywords: Positive Political Theory, judicial politics, judicial hierarchy, securities, fraud on the market, group pleading

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Date posted: July 3, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Tiller, Emerson H. and Yoon, Albert, Private Securities Litigation and the Courts: Positive Political Theory and Evidence (June 30, 2006). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=913415 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.913415

Contact Information

Emerson H. Tiller (Contact Author)
Northwestern University - School of Law ( email )
375 E. Chicago Ave
Unit 1505
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
Albert Yoon
University of Toronto - Faculty of Law ( email )
78 and 84 Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2C5
Canada
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