Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=915304
 
 

Footnotes (22)



 


 



The Rhetoric Conspiracy: Why Rhetoric is Too Powerful and Had to Be Lobotomized (Part 1 of 3 in the Rhetoric Series)


David C. Logan


University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business; CultureSync

Halee Fischer-Wright


CultureSync; University of Colorado

July 6, 2006

Barbados Group Working Paper No. 06-05

Abstract:     
Historically, rhetoric as an art has been considered both nefarious and weak. The authors, in a three part series on rhetoric, describe the "lobotomization" of rhetoric, its true power, and its applications with individuals and organizations. This first working paper describes the historical context of the lobotomization - the separation of "Invention" from the other four canons of rhetoric, leaving rhetoric the basis of Freshman Composition and Public Speaking. It then discusses the power of rhetoric, beginning with the human capacity to name objects and people, resulting in leverage over the action of others. Finally, the article suggests a new definition for rhetoric: "The means through which one creates and populates worlds of meaning (language-based realities)."

Number of Pages in PDF File: 14

Keywords: Rhetoric, Corporate Culture, Leadership, Organizational Behavior, Organizational Change

JEL Classification: D23, M14

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: July 10, 2006 ; Last revised: January 2, 2008

Suggested Citation

Logan, David C. and Fischer-Wright, Halee, The Rhetoric Conspiracy: Why Rhetoric is Too Powerful and Had to Be Lobotomized (Part 1 of 3 in the Rhetoric Series) (July 6, 2006). Barbados Group Working Paper No. 06-05. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=915304 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.915304

Contact Information

David C. Logan (Contact Author)
University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business ( email )
Bridge Hall 300
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
310-625-1551 (Phone)
CultureSync ( email )
1801 Century Park East Suite 2400
Los Angeles, CA 90067
United States
310-556-9632 (Phone)
Halee Fischer-Wright
CultureSync ( email )
1801 Century Park East
Los Angeles, CA 90067
United States
University of Colorado ( email )
4200 E. Ninth Avenue
Denver, CO 80262
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 3,131
Downloads: 936
Download Rank: 12,231
Footnotes:  22
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo4 in 0.641 seconds