Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=943520
 


 



Law & Entrepreneurship: Do Courts Matter?


Masako Ueda


University of Wisconsin, Madison - School of Business; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

D. Gordon Smith


Brigham Young University - J. Reuben Clark Law School


Entrepreneurial Business Law Journal, Vol. 2, No. 1, p. 353, 2006
Univ. of Wisconsin Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1029

Abstract:     
In this essay, we sketch the outlines of a research agenda exploring links between courts and entrepreneurship. Our conception of "law and entrepreneurship" encompasses the study of positive law (including constitutions, statutes, and regulations), common law doctrines, and private ordering that relate to "the discovery and exploitation of profitable opportunities by new firms."

We briefly survey the economics literatures that relate to law and entrepreneurship, including the "law and finance" literature launched by the work of Rafael La Porta, Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes, Andrei Shleifer, and Robert Vishny ("LLSV"). Relying on the suggestive work of LLSV and other economists who have labored over the connections between entrepreneurship and law, we suspect that courts may play an important role in facilitating or hindering entrepreneurial activity.

We are particularly interested in the possibility that courts may facilitate the evolution of legal rules to address novel issues raised by entrepreneurial firms. This "adaptability hypothesis" may be subject to empirical testing, thus shedding light on the otherwise perplexing divide between common law and civil law countries identified by LLSV. The motivation for such a test lies in the conjecture that common law countries update their laws more frequently than civil law countries through judicial intervention. Adaptability in this sense is said to encourage entrepreneurship because outmoded laws allow for opportunism, thus discouraging capital formation. The adaptability hypothesis implies that judges in common law systems have more room to maneuver than judges in civil law systems, and we describe the method by which we intend to approach our future study of adaptability.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 17

Keywords: law and entrepreneurship, legal origins, common law, civil law, judicial adaptability

JEL Classification: G32, G34, K22, L26

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Date posted: November 9, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Ueda, Masako and Smith, D. Gordon, Law & Entrepreneurship: Do Courts Matter?. Entrepreneurial Business Law Journal, Vol. 2, No. 1, p. 353, 2006; Univ. of Wisconsin Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1029. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=943520

Contact Information

Masako Ueda
University of Wisconsin, Madison - School of Business ( email )
975 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706
United States
608-262-3656 (Phone)
608-265-4195 (Fax)
Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)
77 Bastwick Street
London, EC1V 3PZ
United Kingdom
Gordon Smith (Contact Author)
Brigham Young University - J. Reuben Clark Law School ( email )
422 JRCB
Provo, UT 84602
United States
801.422.3233 (Phone)
801.422.0390 (Fax)
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