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http://ssrn.com/abstract=943772
 
 

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Transitions in Terrorism Insurance: The Debate over TRIA


Anne Layne-Farrar


Charles River Associates; Northwestern University

Daniel D. Garcia-Swartz


Charles River Associates - Chicago Office

November 2006

Barbon Discussion Paper No. 06-04

Abstract:     
In this paper we summarize the motivations for enacting the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA) and provide a brief description of its provisions. We then turn to the controversy over TRIA's extension. Multiple views over the role of government in terrorism insurance have been expressed in both the academic and the popular literatures. Even the federal government is divided concerning the efficacy of TRIA. We cull what lessons we can from the debate and its many points of view. We conclude that TRIA has served a useful purpose as a temporary stopgap measure, allowing the industry much needed time to regroup in the face of a dramatically altered risk landscape.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 29

Keywords: TRIA, Terrorism, Regulation, Insurance


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Date posted: November 10, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Layne-Farrar, Anne and Garcia-Swartz, Daniel D., Transitions in Terrorism Insurance: The Debate over TRIA (November 2006). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=943772 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.943772

Contact Information

Anne Layne-Farrar (Contact Author)
Charles River Associates ( email )
1 South Wacker Drive
Suite 3400
Chicago, IL 60606
United States
312-377-9238 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.crai.com
Northwestern University ( email )
2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
Daniel D. Garcia-Swartz
Charles River Associates - Chicago Office ( email )
1 S.Wacker Drive # 3400
Chicago, IL 60606
United States
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