Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=951309
 
 

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In Your Car No One Can Hear You Scream! Are Traffic Controls in Cities a Necessary Evil?


Martin Cassini


International Advisory Council of the Kyoto World Cities New Mobility Program; Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)


Economic Affairs, Vol. 26, No. 4, pp. 75-78, December 2006

Abstract:     
Although widely accepted, traffic controls are an unnecessary evil, imposed on a road network by governments with no commercial incentive to ensure the free flow of traffic. Far from making our roads safer and less congested, traffic lights make matters worse. They take our eyes off the road, obstruct our progress and cause needless delay. In the process they damage our health, the economy and the environment. There is another way: remove controls and restore the common law principle of first-come, first-served - or "filter-in-turn", as it's known in the Channel Islands. The optimum form of traffic control is self-control. The onus should be on government to prove otherwise.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 4

Accepted Paper Series


Date posted: December 13, 2006  

Suggested Citation

Cassini, Martin, In Your Car No One Can Hear You Scream! Are Traffic Controls in Cities a Necessary Evil?. Economic Affairs, Vol. 26, No. 4, pp. 75-78, December 2006. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=951309 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0270.2006.00675.x

Contact Information

Martin Cassini (Contact Author)
International Advisory Council of the Kyoto World Cities New Mobility Program ( email )
London
United Kingdom
+07736 151 282 (Phone)
Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) ( email )
2 Lord North Street, Westminster
London, SW1P 3LB
United Kingdom
+07736 151 282 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.iea.org.uk/record.jsp?type=release&ID=118
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