Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=959676
 


 



To See Oneself as a Target of a Justified Revolution: Thomas Jefferson and Gabriel's Uprising


William G. Merkel


Charleston School of Law

2003

American Nineteenth Century History, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2003

Abstract:     
Examines Jefferson's response to Gabriel's Uprising and argues that Jefferson employed the language of criminal theory in urging Virginia Governor James Monroe to spare the lives of convicted conspirators for the sake of justice and the state's image before the enlightened world. Jefferson's analysis of the slave rebels' acts and intentions makes clear that - at least in abstract, philosophical terms - Jefferson saw the slave uprising as justified, while he viewed white Virginia's resort to deadly force to counter the revolt as at best excusable.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 31

Keywords: Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, Haitian Revolution, Gabriel, Virginia, criminal theory, justification, St. George Tucker, legal education, slave rebellion, Election of 1800, militia, Richmond, James Sidbury, Douglas Egerton

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Date posted: January 29, 2007 ; Last revised: August 3, 2013

Suggested Citation

Merkel, William G., To See Oneself as a Target of a Justified Revolution: Thomas Jefferson and Gabriel's Uprising (2003). American Nineteenth Century History, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2003. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=959676

Contact Information

William G. Merkel (Contact Author)
Charleston School of Law ( email )
Charleston, SC 29402
United States
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