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The Mystery of Human Capital as Engine of Growth, or Why the Us Became the Economic Superpower in the 20th Century


Isaac Ehrlich


State University of New York at Buffalo - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Chicago - University of Chicago Press; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

January 2007

NBER Working Paper No. w12868

Abstract:     
This paper offers a thesis as to why the US overtook the UK and other European countries in the 20th century in both aggregate and per-capita GDP, as a case study of recent models of endogenous growth where human capital is the "engine of growth". The conjecture is that the ascendancy of the US as an economic superpower owes in large measure to its relatively faster human capital formation. Whether the thesis has legs to stand on is assessed through stylized facts indicating that the US led other OECD countries in schooling attainments per adult population over the 20 century, especially at the secondary and tertiary levels. While human capital is viewed as the direct facilitator of growth, the underlying factors driving the US ascendancy are linked to the superior returns the political-economic system in the US has so far offered individual human capital attainments, both home-produced and imported.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 43

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Date posted: January 31, 2007  

Suggested Citation

Ehrlich, Isaac, The Mystery of Human Capital as Engine of Growth, or Why the Us Became the Economic Superpower in the 20th Century (January 2007). NBER Working Paper No. w12868. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=960443

Contact Information

Isaac Ehrlich (Contact Author)
State University of New York at Buffalo - Department of Economics ( email )
415 Fronczak Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
United States
716-645 2121 (Phone)
716-645 2127 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://wings.buffalo.edu/economics/ehrlich.htm
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )
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Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
University of Chicago - University of Chicago Press ( email )
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Chicago, IL 60637
United States
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) ( email )
P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany
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