Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=986932
 
 

References (18)



 
 

Citations (17)



 


 



When are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States


David M. Cutler


Harvard University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Edward L. Glaeser


Harvard University - John F. Kennedy School of Government, Department of Economics; Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Jacob L. Vigdor


Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy; Duke University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

May 2007

NBER Working Paper No. w13082

Abstract:     
Recent literature on the relationship between ethnic or racial segregation and outcomes has failed to produce a consensus view of the role of ghettos; some studies suggest that residence in an enclave is beneficial, some reach the opposite conclusion, and still others imply that any relationship is small. This paper presents new evidence on this relationship using data on first-generation immigrants in the United States. Using average group characteristics as instruments for segregation, controlling for individual characteristics and both metropolitan area and country-of-origin fixed effects, we estimate impacts of residential concentration that vary with group human capital levels. Residential concentration can be beneficial, but primarily for more educated groups. The mean impact of residential concentration varies across measures, which may illuminate some of the causal mechanisms relating segregation to outcomes.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 39

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: June 27, 2007  

Suggested Citation

Cutler, David M. and Glaeser, Edward L. and Vigdor, Jacob L., When are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States (May 2007). NBER Working Paper No. w13082. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=986932

Contact Information

David M. Cutler (Contact Author)
Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )
Littauer Center, Room 315A
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-496-5216 (Phone)
617-495-8570 (Fax)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-868-3900 (Phone)
617-868-2742 (Fax)
Edward L. Glaeser
Harvard University - John F. Kennedy School of Government, Department of Economics ( email )
Littauer Center
Room 315A
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-496-2150 (Phone)
617-496-1722 (Fax)
Brookings Institution
1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036-2188
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Jacob L. Vigdor
Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy ( email )
Box 90312
Durham, NC 27708
United States
919-613-7354 (Phone)
Duke University - Department of Economics
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 431
Downloads: 20
References:  18
Citations:  17

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo6 in 0.344 seconds