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The Institute for the Study of the Judiciary, Politics, and the Media (IJPM) is a collaborative effort between Syracuse University's College of Law, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. IJPM is devoted to the interdisciplinary study of issues at the intersection of law, politics, and the media. The institute sponsors lectures, conferences, and symposia designed to foster discussion and debate between legal scholars, sitting judges, and working journalists. The institute provides research grants and seed money for scholars pursuing law-oriented projects that cut across traditional academic boundaries. The institute also oversees a cross-disciplinary graduate certificate program organized around a team-taught course offerings. To learn more about IJPM and its activities, please visit http://jpm.syr.edu/.


Table of Contents

The Second Limb of Lange: The Continuing Uncertainties with the Implied Freedom of Political Communication

James Stellios, Australian National University - ANU College of Law

A Modest Proposal: Legalize Millions of Undocumented Immigrants with the Change of a Single Statutory Date

Alexander Thomas Holtzman, Ohio State University (OSU) - Michael E. Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University (OSU) - John Glenn School of Public Affairs

Symbolic Politics and the Regulation of Executive Compensation: A Comparison of the Great Depression and the Great Recession

Sandra L. Suarez, Temple University

Score Another One for the Internet? The Role of the Networked Public Sphere in the U.S. Net Neutrality Policy Debate

Robert Faris, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Hal Roberts, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Bruce Etling, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Dalia Othman, Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Yochai Benkler, Harvard University


LAW, POLITICS & THE MEDIA eJOURNAL
Sponsored by Institute for the Study of the Judiciary,
Politics, and the Media (IJPM) at Syracuse University

"The Second Limb of Lange: The Continuing Uncertainties with the Implied Freedom of Political Communication" Free Download
ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 14-49

JAMES STELLIOS, Australian National University - ANU College of Law
Email:

The article considers four areas of continuing uncertainty with the application of the second limb of the Lange test arising out of a string of High Court cases over the last few years.

"A Modest Proposal: Legalize Millions of Undocumented Immigrants with the Change of a Single Statutory Date" Free Download

ALEXANDER THOMAS HOLTZMAN, Ohio State University (OSU) - Michael E. Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University (OSU) - John Glenn School of Public Affairs
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Nearly 12 million undocumented immigrants currently live in the United States. Seemingly not a day goes by where the press does not cover immigration and immigrant issues. These articles discuss everything from the day-to-day experiences of undocumented immigrants in Alabama or Arizona, to the macro-political implications of Congress passing, or failing to pass, comprehensive immigration reform legislation. Yet, despite the press coverage, the on the ground realities, and the political ramifications, Congress has been unable to reform our broken immigration system. One reason posited for this failure is that the proposed solutions are simply too complicated. However, with respect to addressing the U.S.’s undocumented immigrant population, the solution need not be: Congress may amend a single date in the registry statute under Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) § 249, 8 U.S.C. § 1259, last altered during the Reagan Administration. By amending a single date, Congress could provide a path to legalization and citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants with strong ties to the communities where they live and work.

"Symbolic Politics and the Regulation of Executive Compensation: A Comparison of the Great Depression and the Great Recession" Free Download
Politics & Society 42.1 (2014): 73-105

SANDRA L. SUAREZ, Temple University
Email:

When politicians feel popular pressure to act, but are unwilling or unable to address the root cause of the problem, they resort to symbolic policymaking. In this paper, I examine excessive executive compensation as an issue that rose to the top of the political agenda during both the Great Depression and the Great Recession. Presidential candidates, members of Congress, the media, and the public alike blamed corporate greed for the economic downturn. In both instances, however, enacted legislation stopped short of changing the way in which executive pay was determined or placing effective, enforceable limits on it. I analyze the nature of the democratic process and contend that public policy scholars need to pay more attention to the occurrence of symbolic policies. The category of symbolic policies offers a more accurate approach to understanding the politics of executive compensation in the US during the two crises and helps explain why, in spite of the recent legislative efforts, it continues to rise.

"Score Another One for the Internet? The Role of the Networked Public Sphere in the U.S. Net Neutrality Policy Debate" Free Download
Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2015-4

ROBERT FARIS, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Email:
HAL ROBERTS, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Email:
BRUCE ETLING, Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Email:
DALIA OTHMAN, Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Email:
YOCHAI BENKLER, Harvard University
Email:

In this paper we study the public debate over net neutrality in the United States from January through November 2014. We compiled, mapped, and analyzed over 16,000 stories published on net neutrality, augmented by data from Twitter, bit.ly, and Google Trends. Using a mixed-methods approach that combines link analysis with qualitative content analysis, we describe the evolution of the debate over time and assess the role, reach, and influence of different media sources and advocacy groups in setting the agenda, framing the debate, and mobilizing collective action. We conclude that a diverse set of actors working in conjunction through the networked public sphere played a central, arguably decisive, role in turning around the Federal Communications Commission policy on net neutrality.

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About this eJournal

Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Judiciary, Politics, and the Media (IJPM) at Syracuse University.


Legal systems operate in a complex environment of principle, political pressure, and media coverage. The goal of the Law, Politics, and the Media subject eJournal is to distribute abstracts of working papers and articles that promote a more integrated understanding of law, courts, and their environment. To this end, the eJournal seeks scholarship that addresses any combination of legal, political, and media-related themes in the analysis of legal institutions, beliefs, and practices. The eJournal is open to work from the social sciences, the humanities, and the legal academy. Papers and articles that focus on the United States, as well as scholarship that is comparative or international in scope, are welcome.

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Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

BERNARD S. BLACK
Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: rgilson@leland.stanford.edu

Please contact us at the above addresses with your comments, questions or suggestions for LSN-Sub.

Advisory Board

Law, Politics & the Media eJournal

LYLE DENNISTON
Reporter, SCOTUSblog

CHARLES G. GEYH
John F. Kimberling Professor of Law, Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington

TONY MAURO
Supreme Court Correspondent, Legal Times/Incisive Media

MICHAEL MCCANN
Gordon Hirabayashi Professor for Advancement of Citizenship; Director, Comparative Law and Society Studies (CLASS) Center, University of Washington - Department of Political Science

AUSTIN SARAT
William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence & Political Science, Amherst College