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The views expressed in the Legal Information & Technology eJournal are those of the contributing authors and do not imply the endorsement of the sponsor, advisory board, or editors.

The Legal Information & Technology eJournal is sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section (ALL-SIS). The purpose of the Section is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information on academic law libraries and to represent its members' interests and concerns within the American Association of Law Libraries. The eJournal is also sponsored by the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries (MAALL), an official chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries. MAALL includes members from academic, court, and law firm libraries in Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota.


Table of Contents

Experience Explained: A Review of David Skeel's 'True Paradox'

Robert T. Miller, University of Iowa College of Law, Classical Liberal Institute, New York University School of Law

Representing 'Inforgs'

Jeffrey Alan Johnson, Utah Valley University


LEGAL INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY eJOURNAL
Sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association
of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries

"Experience Explained: A Review of David Skeel's 'True Paradox'" Free Download
U Iowa Legal Studies Research Paper No. 15-02

ROBERT T. MILLER, University of Iowa College of Law, Classical Liberal Institute, New York University School of Law
Email:

This is a book review of David Skeel's True Paradox: How Christianity Makes Sense of our Complex World.

"Representing 'Inforgs'" Free Download
Mini-Conference on Digital Sociology, Eastern Sociological Society Conference, 2015

JEFFREY ALAN JOHNSON, Utah Valley University
Email:

Pressures toward “data-driven� or “evidence-based� decisions are ubiquitous in higher education. Implicit in this view, however, is a view of data as an objective representation of observed reality. This paper challenges that approach and explores the ethical implications of a constructive theory of data. Creating data requires some process that narrows the many possible representations of a given state of the world to a single data state. This process is carried out within translation regimes: systems of technical rules and social practices that establish a one-to-one correspondence between a given state of the world and a data state. These regimes also translate the entities about which data is collected into “inforgs,� entities that exist solely as bundles of information. Inforgs significantly complicate the way that data-driven decision processes can be considered representative of students, requiring decisionmakers to create constructs that ultimately represent themselves rather than students. Standard approaches to protecting student privacy are considerably more problematic in translated data processes. When the individuals exist solely as inforgs as in a data-driven decision process, restrictions on the flow of information destroys or at least degrades the inforg itself, excluding the associated person from the process. I conclude by suggesting that mitigating practices, critical institutional research, and a justice-centered approach to information can help manage these challenges.

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About this eJournal

Sponsored by: the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries.


This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts in all areas of legal information scholarship. Topics include (but are not limited to): 1) the impact of legal information on domestic, comparative, and international legal systems; 2) the treatment of legal information authorities and precedents (e.g., citation studies); 3) the examination of rules, practices, and commentary limiting or expanding applications of legal information (e.g., citation to unpublished opinions and to foreign law); 4) the study of economic, legal, political and social conditions limiting or extending access to legal information (e.g., trends in the legal publishing industry, intellectual property regimes, and open access initiatives); 5) the finding and use of legal information by academics to produce legal scholarship, by law students to learn the law, by attorneys in practice, and by judges and others decisionmakers to determine legal outcomes; 6) the history of legal information systems and technological advancements; 7) legal information system design and assessment; and 8) the relationship of substantive areas of law (such as information law, intellectual freedom, intellectual property, and national security law) and other academic disciplines (e.g., information science) to legal information. This includes the scholarship of law librarians, other legal scholars, and other academic disciplines.

The eJournal also includes working papers, forthcoming articles, recently published articles, and selected documents (such as White Papers, briefings, reports, course materials) on the practice of law librarianship. Submissions are welcome in all areas of law librarianship including: 1) administration, management, and leadership; 2) facility design and construction; 3) evaluating and marketing law library services; 4) all aspects of public, technical, and technology services; 5) collection development, including sample collection development policies and procedures; 6) electronic resource management and development including licensing, digitization, and institutional repositories; 7) research and reference services; and 8) legal research instruction teaching methods and substantial or innovative course materials.

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Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

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Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
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Advisory Board

Legal Information & Technology eJournal

DUNCAN ALFORD
Associate Dean/ Director of the Law Library, University of South Carolina School of Law, Associate Dean for the Law Library & Associate Professor of Law, University of South Carolina - Coleman Karesh Law Library

BARBARA BINTLIFF
Professor, University of Texas School of Law

GEORGIA BRISCOE
Associate Director and Head of Technical Services, William A. Wise Law Library, University of Colorado Law School

PAUL D. CALLISTER
Library Director & Associate Professor of Law, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law - Leon E. Bloch Law Library

MICHAEL CHIORAZZI
Associate Dean for Information Services, Professor of Law, Professor of Information Resources and Library Science, and Editor, Legal Reference Services Quarterly, University of Arizona - James E. Rogers College of Law, Cracchiolo Law Library

RICHARD A. DANNER
Rufty Research Professor of Law & Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Duke University School of Law

MARK ENGSBERG
Assistant Professor of Law and Director of Library Services, Emory University School of Law - Hugh F. MacMillan Law Library

PENNY A. HAZELTON
University of Washington - School of Law, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services, University of Washington School of Law - Gallagher Law Library

MARCI HOFFMAN
International & Foreign Law Librarian, University of California School of Law Library - Boalt Hall Law Library

MARY A. HOTCHKISS
Director, Academic Advising, Senior Law Lecturer, University of Washington School of Law

RICHARD A. LEITER
Professor of Law and Director, University of Nebraska College of Law, Schmid Law Library

CAROL A. PARKER
Associate Dean for Finance & Administration; Professor of Law, University of New Mexico School of Law

MARYLIN J. RAISCH
Associate Law Librarian for International and Foreign Law, Georgetown University Law Library

JANET SINDER
Library Director and Associate Professor, Brooklyn Law School