Announcements

The views expressed in the Legal Information & Technology eJournal are those of the contributing authors and do not imply the endorsement of the sponsor, advisory board, or editors.

The Legal Information & Technology eJournal is sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section (ALL-SIS). The purpose of the Section is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information on academic law libraries and to represent its members' interests and concerns within the American Association of Law Libraries. The eJournal is also sponsored by the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries (MAALL), an official chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries. MAALL includes members from academic, court, and law firm libraries in Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota.


Table of Contents

Who Wins in the Supreme Court? An Examination of Attorney and Law Firm Influence

Adam Feldman, University of Southern California, Political Science

The Productivity Commission: A Different Engine for Law Reform?

Lyria Bennett Moses, University of New South Wales
Nicola Jane Gollan, University of New South Wales (UNSW)
Kieran Mark Tranter, Griffith University - Griffith Law School

100 Most Cited Articles in Urban Green and Open Spaces: A Bibliometric Analysis

Mehdi Rakhshandehroo, University Putra Malaysia
Mohd Johari Mohd Yusof, University Putra Malaysia
Nader Ale Ebrahim, University of Malaya (UM) - Department of Engineering Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (UM) - Research Support Unit, Centre of Research Services, Institute of Research Management and Monitoring (IPPP)
Ali Sharghi, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University (SRTTU)
Roozbeh Arabi, University Putra Malaysia

A Primer on Digital Rights Management Technologies

Jasper L. Tran, University of Minnesota

Anonymization and Risk

Ira Rubinstein, New York University (NYU) - Information Law Institut
Woodrow Hartzog, Samford University - Cumberland School of Law, Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society


LEGAL INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY eJOURNAL
Sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association
of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries

"Who Wins in the Supreme Court? An Examination of Attorney and Law Firm Influence" Free Download

ADAM FELDMAN, University of Southern California, Political Science
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Who are the most successful attorneys in the Supreme Court? A helpful way to answer this question is by looking at attorneys' relative influence on the course of the law. This article performs macro and micro-level analyses of the most successful Supreme Court litigators by examining the amount of language shared between over 9,400 Supreme Court merits briefs and their respective Supreme Court opinions from 1946 through 2013. It also examines the most successful firms, groups, and government agencies that employ these attorneys.

"The Productivity Commission: A Different Engine for Law Reform?" Free Download
Griffith Law Review, 2015, Forthcoming
UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2015-40

LYRIA BENNETT MOSES, University of New South Wales
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NICOLA JANE GOLLAN, University of New South Wales (UNSW)
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KIERAN MARK TRANTER, Griffith University - Griffith Law School
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This empirical study analyses the extent to which the Productivity Commission (Commission) relies on different types of evidence in formulating recommendations in a sample of reports. It goes deeper than traditional citation analysis; rather than classifying and counting all material cited in each sample report, it includes only citations that influenced the final recommendations. The findings, which run counter to the rhetoric employed in relation to the Commission’s work, reveal the extent to which the Commission relies on non-quantitative forms of evidence, including bare assertions, personal experience and logical and legal argument, particularly in reports addressing broader questions of social policy. It concludes with a discussion of the significance of these findings, linking them to Graycar’s critique of law reform commissions. As such, it provides a more accurate, but still preliminary, basis for understanding the Commission’s methods than that otherwise appearing in the discourse surrounding the Commission’s work.

"100 Most Cited Articles in Urban Green and Open Spaces: A Bibliometric Analysis" Free Download
Current World Environment, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2015

MEHDI RAKHSHANDEHROO, University Putra Malaysia
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MOHD JOHARI MOHD YUSOF, University Putra Malaysia
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NADER ALE EBRAHIM, University of Malaya (UM) - Department of Engineering Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (UM) - Research Support Unit, Centre of Research Services, Institute of Research Management and Monitoring (IPPP)
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ALI SHARGHI, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University (SRTTU)
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ROOZBEH ARABI, University Putra Malaysia
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Researchers have contributed significantly to the development of the subject of urban green and open spaces (UGOS) in both practical and fundamental aspects. As the number of citations indicates a paper and author’s competency, the online web of science (ISI) was browsed to identify the 100 most cited papers in the field of UGOS from 1980 to 2013. Papers were analyzed for authorship, journal sources, publishers, institutions, countries, year of publication, categories, and author keywords. The total number of citations was compared to the average number of citations per year. From 1105 UGOS papers returned, the maximum number of citations was 212. The top 100 most cited were published from 1988 to 2011, with the majority in 2007. A remarkable distinction was found in the comparison of total citations and average citations per year. As total linear trend indicates a significant growth in influential articles, urban green and open spaces are a developing subject in landscape and urban planning. This study gives an insight into the readership of UGOS by highlighting key papers.

"A Primer on Digital Rights Management Technologies" Free Download
Chapter 3 in DIGITAL RIGHTS MANAGEMENTS: A LIBRARIAN’S GUIDE (Scarecrow Press 2016)

JASPER L. TRAN, University of Minnesota
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“DRM is not a single technology and it is not even a single philosophy . . . DRM is not thin copyright, and it isn’t even thick copyright; DRM is potentially a nearly absolute protection of the works.? DRM protects the source and manages its accessibility through DRM technologies.

This Chapter explores various DRM technologies employed by content owners and publishers employ to prevent unauthorized use. DRM can hinder or threaten information intermediaries such as libraries when they supply digital content controlled by DRM technologies that they do not manage. Therefore, librarians need to be aware of commercial DRM applications and understand the various DRM technologies in this increasingly protected digital information age.

This Chapter begins by exploring the four DRM schemes of prevention, restriction, deterrence, and detection. This Chapter then discusses in details various DRM tools and DRM systems. This Chapter ends with how libraries can protect their investment when they do not control the DRM.

"Anonymization and Risk" Free Download
Washington Law Review, Vol. 91, No. 2, 2016

IRA RUBINSTEIN, New York University (NYU) - Information Law Institut
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WOODROW HARTZOG, Samford University - Cumberland School of Law, Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society
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Perfect anonymization of data sets has failed. But the process of protecting data subjects in shared information remains integral to privacy practice and policy. While the deidentification debate has been vigorous and productive, there is no clear direction for policy. As a result, the law has been slow to adapt a holistic approach to protecting data subjects when data sets are released to others. Currently, the law is focused on whether an individual can be identified within a given set. We argue that the better locus of data release policy is on the process of minimizing the risk of reidentification and sensitive attribute disclosure. Process-based data release policy, which resembles the law of data security, will help us move past the limitations of focusing on whether data sets have been “anonymized.? It draws upon different tactics to protect the privacy of data subjects, including accurate deidentification rhetoric, contracts prohibiting reidentification and sensitive attribute disclosure, data enclaves, and query-based strategies to match required protections with the level of risk. By focusing on process, data release policy can better balance privacy and utility where nearly all data exchanges carry some risk.

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About this eJournal

Sponsored by: the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries.


This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts in all areas of legal information scholarship. Topics include (but are not limited to): 1) the impact of legal information on domestic, comparative, and international legal systems; 2) the treatment of legal information authorities and precedents (e.g., citation studies); 3) the examination of rules, practices, and commentary limiting or expanding applications of legal information (e.g., citation to unpublished opinions and to foreign law); 4) the study of economic, legal, political and social conditions limiting or extending access to legal information (e.g., trends in the legal publishing industry, intellectual property regimes, and open access initiatives); 5) the finding and use of legal information by academics to produce legal scholarship, by law students to learn the law, by attorneys in practice, and by judges and others decisionmakers to determine legal outcomes; 6) the history of legal information systems and technological advancements; 7) legal information system design and assessment; and 8) the relationship of substantive areas of law (such as information law, intellectual freedom, intellectual property, and national security law) and other academic disciplines (e.g., information science) to legal information. This includes the scholarship of law librarians, other legal scholars, and other academic disciplines.

The eJournal also includes working papers, forthcoming articles, recently published articles, and selected documents (such as White Papers, briefings, reports, course materials) on the practice of law librarianship. Submissions are welcome in all areas of law librarianship including: 1) administration, management, and leadership; 2) facility design and construction; 3) evaluating and marketing law library services; 4) all aspects of public, technical, and technology services; 5) collection development, including sample collection development policies and procedures; 6) electronic resource management and development including licensing, digitization, and institutional repositories; 7) research and reference services; and 8) legal research instruction teaching methods and substantial or innovative course materials.

Editors: Randy J. Diamond, University of Missouri, and Lee F. Peoples, Oklahoma City University

Submissions

To submit your research to SSRN, sign in to the SSRN User HeadQuarters, click the My Papers link on left menu and then the Start New Submission button at top of page.

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Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

BERNARD S. BLACK
Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
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Advisory Board

Legal Information & Technology eJournal

DUNCAN ALFORD
Associate Dean/ Director of the Law Library, University of South Carolina School of Law, Associate Dean for the Law Library & Associate Professor of Law, University of South Carolina - Coleman Karesh Law Library

BARBARA BINTLIFF
Professor, University of Texas School of Law

GEORGIA BRISCOE
Associate Director and Head of Technical Services, William A. Wise Law Library, University of Colorado Law School

PAUL D. CALLISTER
Library Director & Associate Professor of Law, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law - Leon E. Bloch Law Library

MICHAEL CHIORAZZI
Associate Dean for Information Services, Professor of Law, Professor of Information Resources and Library Science, and Editor, Legal Reference Services Quarterly, University of Arizona - James E. Rogers College of Law, Cracchiolo Law Library

RICHARD A. DANNER
Rufty Research Professor of Law & Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Duke University School of Law

MARK ENGSBERG
Assistant Professor of Law and Director of Library Services, Emory University School of Law - Hugh F. MacMillan Law Library

PENNY A. HAZELTON
University of Washington - School of Law, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services, University of Washington School of Law - Gallagher Law Library

MARCI HOFFMAN
International & Foreign Law Librarian, University of California School of Law Library - Boalt Hall Law Library

MARY A. HOTCHKISS
Director, Academic Advising, Senior Law Lecturer, University of Washington School of Law

RICHARD A. LEITER
Professor of Law and Director, University of Nebraska College of Law, Schmid Law Library

CAROL A. PARKER
Associate Dean for Finance & Administration; Professor of Law, University of New Mexico School of Law

MARYLIN J. RAISCH
Associate Law Librarian for International and Foreign Law, Georgetown University Law Library

JANET SINDER
Library Director and Associate Professor, Brooklyn Law School