Announcements

The views expressed in the Legal Information & Technology eJournal are those of the contributing authors and do not imply the endorsement of the sponsor, advisory board, or editors.

The Legal Information & Technology eJournal is sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section (ALL-SIS). The purpose of the Section is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information on academic law libraries and to represent its members' interests and concerns within the American Association of Law Libraries. The eJournal is also sponsored by the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries (MAALL), an official chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries. MAALL includes members from academic, court, and law firm libraries in Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota.


Table of Contents

Managing Disruptive Patron Behavior in Law Libraries: A Grey Paper

Nicole P. Dyszlewski, Roger Williams University - School of Law
Kristen R Moore, Stetson University - College of Law
Genevieve Blake Tung, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - School of Law-Camden

Libraries in the Post-Scarcity Era

Balázs Bodó, University of Amsterdam - Institute for Information Law (IViR)


LEGAL INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY eJOURNAL
Sponsored by the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association
of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries

"Managing Disruptive Patron Behavior in Law Libraries: A Grey Paper" Free Download
Stetson University College of Law Research Paper No. 2015-9

NICOLE P. DYSZLEWSKI, Roger Williams University - School of Law
Email:
KRISTEN R MOORE, Stetson University - College of Law
Email:
GENEVIEVE BLAKE TUNG, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - School of Law-Camden
Email:

Nearly all law library staff have encountered, and likely will encounter, some measure of challenging patron behavior. This white paper, dubbed by the authors a "grey paper" as it attempts to analyze and contend with a fundamentally dynamic phenomenon, was written at the request of the AALL RIPS-SIS Executive Board with the hope of providing a jumping off point for further inquiry and discussion on current best practices in managing difficult, challenging or disruptive patron behavior in law libraries. In lieu of a traditional white paper solution, the authors have included a collection of best practices largely developed based on common themes which emerged from a 2014 online survey of law library staff; follow-up correspondence with several survey respondents; and a review of case law and relevant literature within law librarianship and other fields. The solutions to the problems of disruptive patron interactions can most nearly be found by providing a library atmosphere of safety for patrons and staff; equality in the staff treatment of all library patrons; consistency and predictability in staff responses accomplished by flexibility not rigidity; and communication and transparency of both policies and service limitations. This paper provides practical strategies for attaining that ideal.

"Libraries in the Post-Scarcity Era" Free Download
Bodó B. (2015): Libraries in the post-scarcity era in: Porsdam (ed): Copyrighting Creativity: Creative values, Cultural Heritage Institutions and Systems of Intellectual Property, Ashgate

BAL?ZS BODÓ, University of Amsterdam - Institute for Information Law (IViR)
Email:

In the digital era where, thanks to the ubiquity of electronic copies, the book is no longer a scarce resource, libraries find themselves in an extremely competitive environment. Several different actors are now in a position to provide low cost access to knowledge. One of these competitors are shadow libraries - piratical text collections which have now amassed electronic copies of millions of copyrighted works and provide access to them usually free of charge to anyone around the globe. While such shadow libraries are far from being universal, they are able to offer certain services better, to more people and under more favorable terms than most public or research libraries. This contribution offers insights into the development and the inner workings of one of the biggest scientific shadow libraries on the internet in order to understand what kind of library people create for themselves if they have the means and if they don’t have to abide by the legal, bureaucratic and economic constraints that libraries usually face. I argue that one of the many possible futures of the library is hidden in the shadows, and those who think of the future of libraries can learn a lot from book pirates of the 21st century about how users and readers expect texts in electronic form to be stored, organized and circulated.

^top

About this eJournal

Sponsored by: the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries.


This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts in all areas of legal information scholarship. Topics include (but are not limited to): 1) the impact of legal information on domestic, comparative, and international legal systems; 2) the treatment of legal information authorities and precedents (e.g., citation studies); 3) the examination of rules, practices, and commentary limiting or expanding applications of legal information (e.g., citation to unpublished opinions and to foreign law); 4) the study of economic, legal, political and social conditions limiting or extending access to legal information (e.g., trends in the legal publishing industry, intellectual property regimes, and open access initiatives); 5) the finding and use of legal information by academics to produce legal scholarship, by law students to learn the law, by attorneys in practice, and by judges and others decisionmakers to determine legal outcomes; 6) the history of legal information systems and technological advancements; 7) legal information system design and assessment; and 8) the relationship of substantive areas of law (such as information law, intellectual freedom, intellectual property, and national security law) and other academic disciplines (e.g., information science) to legal information. This includes the scholarship of law librarians, other legal scholars, and other academic disciplines.

The eJournal also includes working papers, forthcoming articles, recently published articles, and selected documents (such as White Papers, briefings, reports, course materials) on the practice of law librarianship. Submissions are welcome in all areas of law librarianship including: 1) administration, management, and leadership; 2) facility design and construction; 3) evaluating and marketing law library services; 4) all aspects of public, technical, and technology services; 5) collection development, including sample collection development policies and procedures; 6) electronic resource management and development including licensing, digitization, and institutional repositories; 7) research and reference services; and 8) legal research instruction teaching methods and substantial or innovative course materials.

Editors: Randy J. Diamond, University of Missouri, and Lee F. Peoples, Oklahoma City University

Submissions

To submit your research to SSRN, sign in to the SSRN User HeadQuarters, click the My Papers link on left menu and then the Start New Submission button at top of page.

Distribution Services

If your organization is interested in increasing readership for its research by starting a Research Paper Series, or sponsoring a Subject Matter eJournal, please email: RPS@SSRN.com

Distributed by

Legal Scholarship Network (LSN), a division of Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP) and Social Science Research Network (SSRN)

Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

BERNARD S. BLACK
Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: rgilson@leland.stanford.edu

Please contact us at the above addresses with your comments, questions or suggestions for LSN-Sub.

Advisory Board

Legal Information & Technology eJournal

DUNCAN ALFORD
Associate Dean/ Director of the Law Library, University of South Carolina School of Law, Associate Dean for the Law Library & Associate Professor of Law, University of South Carolina - Coleman Karesh Law Library

BARBARA BINTLIFF
Professor, University of Texas School of Law

GEORGIA BRISCOE
Associate Director and Head of Technical Services, William A. Wise Law Library, University of Colorado Law School

PAUL D. CALLISTER
Library Director & Associate Professor of Law, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law - Leon E. Bloch Law Library

MICHAEL CHIORAZZI
Associate Dean for Information Services, Professor of Law, Professor of Information Resources and Library Science, and Editor, Legal Reference Services Quarterly, University of Arizona - James E. Rogers College of Law, Cracchiolo Law Library

RICHARD A. DANNER
Rufty Research Professor of Law & Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Duke University School of Law

MARK ENGSBERG
Assistant Professor of Law and Director of Library Services, Emory University School of Law - Hugh F. MacMillan Law Library

PENNY A. HAZELTON
University of Washington - School of Law, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services, University of Washington School of Law - Gallagher Law Library

MARCI HOFFMAN
International & Foreign Law Librarian, University of California School of Law Library - Boalt Hall Law Library

MARY A. HOTCHKISS
Director, Academic Advising, Senior Law Lecturer, University of Washington School of Law

RICHARD A. LEITER
Professor of Law and Director, University of Nebraska College of Law, Schmid Law Library

CAROL A. PARKER
Associate Dean for Finance & Administration; Professor of Law, University of New Mexico School of Law

MARYLIN J. RAISCH
Associate Law Librarian for International and Foreign Law, Georgetown University Law Library

JANET SINDER
Library Director and Associate Professor, Brooklyn Law School