Table of Contents

Attracting Attentive Academics: Paper, Person or Place?

Isabel Günther, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich - Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences (GESS)
Melanie Grosse, University of Goettingen (Gottingen)
Stephan Klasen, University of Goettingen (Gottingen) - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute), Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Finding the 'Middle Ground' in Academics: Important Lessons from Roger Garrison in Austrian Economics

Peter J. Boettke, George Mason University - Department of Economics
Rosolino Antonio Candela, George Mason University


ECONOMICS EDUCATOR: COURSES, CASES & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Attracting Attentive Academics: Paper, Person or Place?" Free Download

ISABEL GÜNTHER, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich - Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences (GESS)
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MELANIE GROSSE, University of Goettingen (Gottingen)
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STEPHAN KLASEN, University of Goettingen (Gottingen) - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute), Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
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We analyze the drivers of presence (size of audience) and participation (number of questions asked) in parallel sessions at a large economics conference, using the annual meeting of the German Economics Association in 2012 as a case study. We find that the location of the presentation is at least as important for the number of academics attending a talk as the combined effect of the person presenting and the paper presented. Being a presenter in a late morning session on the second day of a conference, close to the place where coffee is served, significantly increases the size of the audience. Single-authored papers with long titles as well as those by junior researchers attract significantly fewer attendees. When it comes to asking questions, location becomes less important, but smaller rooms lead to more questions being asked (by women). Younger researchers as well as very senior researchers attract more questions and comments. There are also interesting and sizable gender effects. Women attend research sessions more diligently than men (at any point in time only half of the registered male economists compared to nearly two-thirds of female economists are attending a session), but seem to ask fewer questions than men. Men are less likely to attend presentations on health, education, welfare, and development economics than women. Our findings suggest that strategic scheduling of sessions could ensure better participation at conferences. Moreover, different behaviors of men and women at conferences might contribute to the lack of women in senior scientist positions.

"Finding the 'Middle Ground' in Academics: Important Lessons from Roger Garrison in Austrian Economics" Free Download
Journal of Private Enterprise, Forthcoming

PETER J. BOETTKE, George Mason University - Department of Economics
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ROSOLINO ANTONIO CANDELA, George Mason University
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Roger Garrison has played a key role in advancing ideas in Austrian macroeconomics throughout his career. As contributors to this symposium, we discuss a number of “Garrisonian wisdoms? that have provided important lessons for economists in navigating a “middle ground? and seeking professional advancement within academic economics. Taken together, Garrison’s lessons reveal how one can successfully build and sustain an academic career while staying committed to the advancement and further development of the intellectual tradition of the Austrian School of Economics.

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Economics Educator: Courses, Cases & Teaching eJournal

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