ECONOMICS EDUCATOR: COURSES, CASES & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Incorporating Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook in Economics Classrooms" Free Download

ABDULLAH A. AL-BAHRANI, Northern Kentucky University
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DARSHAK PATEL, University of Tennessee, Martin
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Social media is one of the most current and dynamic developments in education. In general, the field of economics has lagged behind other disciplines in incorporating technologies in the classroom. This paper provides a guide for economics educators on how to incorporate Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook inside and outside of the classroom. The aims of the article are to discuss the potential benefits of social media for economics curricula, explain how to effectively use social media, and reduce some of the concerns associated with implementing new technology.

"Inside the ‘Homo Oeconomicus Brain’: Towards a Reform of the Economics Curriculum?" Free Download
Forthcoming in: Journal of Business Ethics Education 11 (2014); 1-36.

MANUEL WÖRSDÖRFER, Goethe University Frankfurt
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Economics students and economists have – grosso modo – a bad societal reputation. This is, roughly speaking, the provocative result of the majority of empirical studies on economic education. On average, economists and economics students behave in a more self-interested way than others; they are more prone to deviate from the moral good; they tend to free ride more often and invest less in public goods games; they are more corrupt and less honest in lost letter experiments, less cooperative in solidarity games, and accept less and keep more in ultimatum bargaining games. In short: they seem to behave more in accordance with the predictions of the rational or self-interest model of standard economics, the Homo oeconomicus model. What might be the reasons that the degree of anti-social and uncooperative behavior is on average significantly more pronounced among economics students compared to other student groups? Can these empirical findings be explained by the self-selection effect and/or the indoctrination effect? What are the implications of these empirical results for economic ethics and economic education? Which roles do the economics curriculum and economic textbooks play? Do they have any effect on everyday behavior? Is the way economics is taught at (business) schools, colleges and universities co-responsible for the considerable behavioral differences? And what can be done in order to reverse these trends and to foster other-regarding preferences and pro-social behavior? The paper analyzes these and other questions with the help of experimental economics, behavioral economics and neuroeconomics. It also draws on recent findings of brain physiology research in general and neuroplasticity in particular.

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About this eJournal

This eJournal is devoted to advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning economics encouraging contributors to combine ideas in economics with current ideas about teaching and learning, in a way that is public, open to critique, and in a form on which others can build in a timely manner. Unlike refereed journals, this electronic journal does not subject submissions to review but will publish abstracts as works in progress with links to the full-text working papers in the SSRN database. Eligible submissions could provide descriptions of innovative courses, case studies, student activities and other teaching materials and information related to the manner in which economics is taught or its teaching assessed at the post-secondary level. (Note: Suitable material submitted to the Journal of Economic Education (http://www.Indiana.edu/~econed) will be considered automatically for inclusion in Economics Educator, thus, giving potential JEE authors worldwide visibility for their work during the extensive JEE refereeing and editorial process.)

Editor: William Walstad, University of Nebraska at Lincoln

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ERN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

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Harvard Business School, Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), Inc., National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
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Advisory Board

Economics Educator: Courses, Cases & Teaching eJournal

SAM ANTHONY ALLGOOD
Associate Professor of Economics, University of Nebraska at Lincoln - Department of Economics

WILLIAM L. GOFFE
Associate Professor of Economics, SUNY Oswego - Department of Economics

PAUL W. GRIMES
Dean, Kelce College of Business, Pittsburg State University, Emeritus Professor of Economics, Mississippi State University - College of Business

KIMMARIE MCGOLDRICK
Professor of Economics, University of Richmond - E. Claiborne Robins School of Business

MICHAEL W. WATTS
Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Economic Education, Purdue University - Department of Economics