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Table of Contents

Sustainable Development & Sustainability Reporting Practices in India

Ajay Harivansh Shukla, University of Pune
Vishakha Ketan Waikar, Ashoka Business School

Social Capital in Suburban Zones of Krakow and Poznań

Jaroslaw Dzialek, Jagiellonian University in Krakow - Institute of Geography and Spatial Management
Karolina Listwan-Franczak, Jagiellonian University in Krakow - Institute of Geography and Spatial Management
Janusz Górny, Adam Mickiewicz University

Marriage, Tradition, Multiculturalism and the Accommodation of Difference in Australia

Michael C. Quinlan, The University of Notre Dame Australia

After Growth: Rethinking the Role of the Economy in Japanese Society and Culture

Carsten Herrmann-Pillath, Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies

Rape Endemic in Nigeria: Causes, Effect and Probable Way Out

Esther O Mofoluwawo, EMMANUEL ALAYANDE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION - Department of Social Studies

Profitability Determinants of Islamic Banking in Sri Lanka

Hiruni Nirmali Kaushala, Independent
R. P. C. R. Rajapakse, University of Sri Jayewardenepura

The Impacts of Climatic and Non-Climatic Factors on Household Food Security: Study on Malaysian East Coast Poor

Md. Mahmudul Alam, Universiti Utara Malaysia
Chamhuri Siwar, National University of Malaysia (UKM)
Abu N. M. Wahid, Abu N. M. Wahid

Model-Driven Engineering and Creative Arts Approach to Designing Climate Change Response System for Rural Africa: A Case Study of Adum-Aiona Community in Nigeria

Emmanuel Okewu, Centre for Information Technology and Systems

A Glimpse into the Sharing Economy: An Analysis of Uber Driver-Partners in Egypt

Nagla Rizk, American University in Cairo - School of Business, American University in Cairo - Access to Knowledge for Development Center (A2K4D)

People in Politics: The Dynamics of Polarization and Power

Pradeep Nair, Central University of Himachal Pradesh
Sandeep Sharma, Central University of Himachal Pradesh

Market Valuation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Under a Mandatory Reporting Regime: Evidence from the UK

Diogenis Baboukardos, University of Essex - Essex Business School

Life in the Fringes: Economic and Sociocultural Practices in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Borderlands in Comparative Perspective

Chris Changwe Nshimbi, Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), University of Pretoria


CULTURE AREA STUDIES eJOURNAL

"Sustainable Development & Sustainability Reporting Practices in India" Free Download
CnR’s IJSSR: Oct-Dec 2016, Vol.02 Issue (III), ISSN: 2454-3187

AJAY HARIVANSH SHUKLA, University of Pune
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VISHAKHA KETAN WAIKAR, Ashoka Business School
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The purpose of this paper is to present the scope of sustainable development and sustainability reporting practices followed, where in details of practices at HCCB have been found and share . The Core Set of Indicators for Sustainable Development as per agenda 21 and matrix of environmental indicators under consideration by The World Bank were also studied during the same.

"Social Capital in Suburban Zones of Krakow and Poznań" Free Download
Working Paper 2017 – Institute of Geography and Spatial Management, Jagiellonian University in Krakow

JAROSLAW DZIALEK, Jagiellonian University in Krakow - Institute of Geography and Spatial Management
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KAROLINA LISTWAN-FRANCZAK, Jagiellonian University in Krakow - Institute of Geography and Spatial Management
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JANUSZ GÓRNY, Adam Mickiewicz University
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This paper examines whether social transformations involved in migrations from large cities into their peripheries translates into increased levels of social capital. It could be reasonably expected that existing population of such peripheries should have higher levels of bonding social capital, whereas the new residents would have greater resources of bridging social capital. Relying on statistical data about the number of non-governmental organisations and public charities, this article tries to answer the question whether on-going suburbanisation translates into heightened social activity levels around the cities of Krakow and Poznań. The paper finds greater numbers of new public associations registered in the suburban zones over the last 10 years, in particular around Poznań.

"Marriage, Tradition, Multiculturalism and the Accommodation of Difference in Australia" Free Download
The University of Notre Dame Australia Law Review, Vol. 18, Article 3 (2017)

MICHAEL C. QUINLAN, The University of Notre Dame Australia
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This paper examines marriage in multicultural and multi-faith Australia. It considers the history of, and reasons for, State recognition of marriage in Australia between one man and one woman entered into voluntarily for life. It argues that the tradition in Australia since European settlement has been for the State to only recognize this traditional form of marriage as marriage. The paper considers the meaning of equality and discrimination and argues that for those concepts to have meaning in the context of marriage it is first necessary to have a clear understanding of why the State does and should continue to have any role in marriage. The paper argues that tradition and empirical evidence support the continuation of State recognition of traditional marriage. The paper also examines the absence of State recognition in Australia of other conceptions of marriage including certain forms of marriage within the Islamic tradition, all cultural marriages celebrated within the traditions of Australia’s Aboriginal peoples and marriages between two persons of the same sex. It argues that tradition and empirical evidence do not presently support the redefinition of marriage to include State recognition of these forms of marriage. The paper concludes that there are powerful grounds for preserving the current definition of marriage in Australia and that it should be preserved.

"After Growth: Rethinking the Role of the Economy in Japanese Society and Culture" Free Download
Introductory paper presented at the second annual meeting of the ‘Deutsch-Japanische Studiengruppe: "Tradition und Wandel im ostasiatischen Kontext", Werner Reimers Stiftung, Bad Homburg, March 9./10, 2017: Nach der Nachkriegszeit – Politik und Gesellschaft in Japan

CARSTEN HERRMANN-PILLATH, Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies
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Panel discussion on economy and society. The paper discusses highlights in five recent Japanese books on de-growth.

"Rape Endemic in Nigeria: Causes, Effect and Probable Way Out" Free Download

ESTHER O MOFOLUWAWO, EMMANUEL ALAYANDE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION - Department of Social Studies
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Nigeria faces a number of problems such as high rate of corruption, increasing unemployment, persistent poverty, lack of basic medical care amongst others. Added to the above stated developmental problems, is the problem of incessant rape permeating the Nigerian society. This paper examines the causes and effects of rape. The paper is essentially library research with internet sources using expository and phenomenological designs. Rape is shown to be a global social problem and its perpetrators cut across all age brackets. The paper recommends amongst others that; the society should exhibit zero tolerance to rape by engaging rape intolerance attitudes, an increased level of empathy; every perpetrator of rape should be exposed to take full responsibility for his or her actions and should under no circumstances be shielded or protected by parents, colleagues or churches. Nigerian government should enforce laws to protect women against rape.

"Profitability Determinants of Islamic Banking in Sri Lanka" Free Download
Nirmali H and Rajapakse, R P C R (2017) "Profitability Determinants of Islamic Banking in Sri Lanka", International Journal of Research, Vol. 4, Issue 5, pp. 19-36

HIRUNI NIRMALI KAUSHALA, Independent
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R. P. C. R. RAJAPAKSE, University of Sri Jayewardenepura
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Amana Investments was established in 1997 as the first Islamic bank in Sri Lanka. Islamic Finance is Sharia compliant finance because and is based on the teachings in the Holy Quran and sacred scripture of the religion of Islam. The aim of this research is to provide an overview on the Islamic Finance Industry of Sri Lanka by identifying the factors that affect the profitability of the industry. The profitability of Islamic banks is measured by three dimensions, i.e. return on assets, and return on equity, earnings per share. Internal explanatory variables include bank size, gearing ratio, asset management, deposit ratio, non-performing loans ratio, asset composition, capital adequacy ratio and operating efficiency, whereas external explanatory variables include gross domestic product (GDP) and consumer price index (CPI). Since Islamic Banking is a relatively new industry within Sri Lanka, there is a high potential to make profits by considering the components of the ratios used as independent variables in the study. Although some components indicated to be profitable, the risk associated with those variables and the other factors such as liquidity and profitability also have to be considered. Results were similar to the other researches done for other countries.

"The Impacts of Climatic and Non-Climatic Factors on Household Food Security: Study on Malaysian East Coast Poor" Free Download
Alam, M.M., Siwar, C., and Wahid, A.N.M. 2016. The Impacts of Climatic and Nonclimatic Factors on Household Food Security in Malaysia: A Study on the Poor Living in the Malaysian East Coast Economic Region. Asia-Pacific Development Journal. Vol. 23(1), 79-104.

MD. MAHMUDUL ALAM, Universiti Utara Malaysia
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CHAMHURI SIWAR, National University of Malaysia (UKM)
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ABU N. M. WAHID, Abu N. M. Wahid
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Sustainable food security at household level is a national concern in many countries. The reasons for household food insecurity include social, economic, political, and personal factors as well as climatic changes and its outcomes. This research aims at finding out the linkage of the factors of climatic changes, non-climatic factors and household resiliencies with the level of household food security among the poor and low income households in Malaysia. This study is based on primary data that were collected in Jul-Oct 2012 through a questionnaire survey on 460 poor and low income households from the Pahang, Kelantan, and Terengganu States of Malaysia. The sample was selected from E-Kasih poor household database based on cluster random sampling technique. Initially the study measures household food security according to the USAID-HFIA model, and ran ordinal regressions under the logit and probit models. This study finds that household food insecurity is not only linked with social and economic factors, but also significantly linked with the climatic factors. Therefore, the food security programs need to be integrated with the adaption programs for climatic change.

"Model-Driven Engineering and Creative Arts Approach to Designing Climate Change Response System for Rural Africa: A Case Study of Adum-Aiona Community in Nigeria" Free Download
Problemy Ekorozwoju – Problems Of Sustainable Development, 2017, Vol. 12, No 1, 101-116

EMMANUEL OKEWU, Centre for Information Technology and Systems
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Experts at the just concluded climate summit in Paris (COP21) are unanimous in opinion that except urgent measures are taken by all humans, average global temperature rise would soon reach the deadly 2oC mark. When this happens, socio-economic livelihoods, particularly in developing economies, would be dealt lethal blow in the wake of associated natural causes such as increased disease burden, soil nutrient destruction, desertification, food insecurity, among others. To avert imminent dangers, nations, including those from Africa, signed a legally binding universally accepted climate control protocol to propagate and regulate environmentally-friendly behaviours globally. The climate vulnerability of Africa as established by literature is concerning. Despite contributing relatively less than other continents to aggregate environmental injustice, the continent is projected to bear the most brunt of environmental degradation. This is on account of her inability to put systems and mechanisms in place to stem consequences of climate change. Hence, our resolve to use a combination of scientific and artistic models to design a response system for tackling climate challenges in Africa. Our model formulation encompasses computational model and creative arts model for drawing attention to environmentally friendly behaviours and climate adaptation and mitigation strategies. In this work, we focus on rural Africa to share experience of climate change impact on agriculture – mainstay of rural African economy. We examine the carbon footprints of a rural community in Nigeria – the Adum-Aiona community – as case study and for industrial experience. The authors will provide operational data to substantiate claims of existential threats posed by greenhouse gas (GHG) generation on livelihoods of rural dwellers. The study will also design and test a Climate Change Response System (CCRS) that will enable people to adapt and reduce climate change impact. To achieve the research objective, the researchers will review literature, gather requirements, model the proposed system using Unified Modelling Language (UML), and test CCRS statically. We expect that the implementation of the proposed system will enable people mitigate the effects of, and adapt to, climate change-induced socio-economic realities. This is besides the fact that the empirical data provided by the study will help clear doubts about the real or perceived threats of climate change. Finally, the industrial experience and case study we share from Africa using model-driven engineering approach will scale up the repository of knowledge of both climate change research and model-driven engineering community.

"A Glimpse into the Sharing Economy: An Analysis of Uber Driver-Partners in Egypt" Free Download

NAGLA RIZK, American University in Cairo - School of Business, American University in Cairo - Access to Knowledge for Development Center (A2K4D)
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The paper offers a glimpse of the driver side of the ride-sharing model in Egypt, provided through the eyes of the driver-partners themselves. Based on a field survey of a sample of Uber driver-partners in Cairo, I study this new form of work against the backdrop of expanding unemployment of the youth and the educated, and continuing employment in the informal sector. I emphasize the relevance of context, particularly the demographic, urban and economic challenges facing Egypt after the uprising of 2011.

"People in Politics: The Dynamics of Polarization and Power" Free Download
Mainstream, Vol. 54, Issue 14, March 25, 2017

PRADEEP NAIR, Central University of Himachal Pradesh
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SANDEEP SHARMA, Central University of Himachal Pradesh

In 1998, while being the head of an alliance of 26 political parties, the then Prime Minister of India Atal Bihari Vajpaee once frustratingly said that India should look for the possibility of adopting presidential system, which, in his views would be more permanent and representative. However, amongst all political compulsions and political opportunism, some of the electoral arrangements at centre and in various states went on for another decade by making coalition politics a more permanent feature of Indian politics. But BJP’s whooping majority in 2014 Lok Sabha elections brought this trend to a halt. Political pundits were left with no options but to redo their political calculations. Nationwide data of assembly elections substantiate this point by making a stronger case for one party rule. The first half of the second decade of 21st century has witnessed a political scene in which 23 states including Delhi, have one party in the position to form a majority government. While there are only six such states where governments are being formed by pre or post poll alliances. With these evidences, we are not terming this the end of coalition politics in India; rather we are interested in examining the factors which have led to a situation of more permanent (a majority) government at centre and state. By looking back to some events in Indian political history and forward to the outcome of Uttar Pradesh, Uttrakhand, Punjab and Manipur assembly elections, we will be unearthing the dynamics of power and polarization in Indian politics.

"Market Valuation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Under a Mandatory Reporting Regime: Evidence from the UK" 
Accounting Forum (Forthcoming)

DIOGENIS BABOUKARDOS, University of Essex - Essex Business School
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This study provides evidence on the potential benefits of mandatory environmental reporting for listed firms’ market valuation. It takes advantage of recent regulation that requires all listed firms in the UK to report their annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in their annual reports and shows that the magnitude of the negative association between GHG emissions and the market value of listed firms decreased after the introduction of the reporting regulation. This decline is attributed to regulation forestalling shareholders’ negative reflexive reaction towards firms’ carbon disclosures, as proposed by the theoretical work of Unerman and O’Dwyer (2007).

"Life in the Fringes: Economic and Sociocultural Practices in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Borderlands in Comparative Perspective" 

CHRIS CHANGWE NSHIMBI, Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), University of Pretoria
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This paper examines the cross-border sociocultural and economic activities of the inhabitants of the contiguous border areas of Zambia, Malawi, and Mozambique (ZMM), in order to compare perceptions towards each of these practices by various actors including informal cross-border traders (ICBTs), ordinary inhabitants of the borderland communities of these countries, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and state and local authorities, among others. The specific sociocultural practices in question include the accessing of social services, fulfillment of sociocultural needs/obligations, and the economic activities, informal cross-border trade. Legislations, policy reports and scientific publications are thoroughly reviewed and interviews with key policymakers, ICBTs, and locals are conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of data collected from the interviews is also performed. Various actors generally regard accessing social services (such as education and health) across borders by nationals of neighboring countries as normal and “acceptable? practices while some forms of informal cross-border trade are regarded “unacceptable.? However, both sociocultural and economic actors engage in cross-border activities out of necessity, convenience, for survival, and as practices which they, being inhabitants of the borderlands, have traditionally followed. Representatives of state and local governments in the adjacent provinces of the contiguous borderlands should form transboundary coordinating committees through which to establish sustainable and effective burden-sharing and service provision systems, to meet the socioeconomic needs of borderland inhabitants.

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About this eJournal

Supported by: American Anthropological Association (AAA)

This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts of studies of specific culture areas. The topics in this eJournal include: Africa; North America; Europe; Middle East; Latin America & South America; Asia & Central Asia; East Asia; South Asia; South East Asia, Oceania, & the Pacific Region; Negative Results - Culture Area Studies.

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University of New Mexico - Department of Anthropology
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